Teaching reflective practice in practice settings: students' perceptions of their clinical educators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Reflective practice in practice settings can enhance practice knowledge, selfassessment and lifelong learning, develop future practice capability and professional identity, and critically appraise practice traditions rather than reproduce them. The inherent power imbalance between student and educator runs the risk for the reflective practice potential not being realised. This study explored final year physiotherapy students' perceptions of clinical educators as teachers of reflection and what role students assigned themselves in learning reflective practice. We found that only assertive students enforced reflection. Others waited for their educators to guide them and some were openly discouraged to reflect. As long as educators neglect the opportunity to deeply explore reflective practice moments with students, opportunities for students to develop autonomy and responsibility may continue to be missed or, at worst, inappropriately developed. Key dilemmas of teaching reflective practice are discussed including its implicit and tacit nature and non-conducive work environments.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)615-627
Number of pages13
JournalTeaching in Higher Education
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2012

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