The causes of groundwater decline in upland Balochistan region of Pakistan

Implication for water management policies

Syed Khair, Richard Culas, Muhammad Hafeez

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

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Abstract

Groundwater levels in the important basins of upland Balochistan are declining at an alarming rate of 2 to 3 meters annually showed by a survey results carried out in mid 2009. Various factors are responsible for this; OLS regression analysis was carried out to analyse the effects of different factors on the watertable decline by using the empirical data from different sources. The results showed that watertable decline increases with; (1) increase in the number of tubewells; (2) continuation of subsidized electric tariff policy; (3) policies of groundwater development; (4) increase in tubewell irrigated area; (5) annual average rainfall. Regression is significant for all factors except rainfall. The model explain an enormous amount of variation in watertable decline with adjusted R2 = 0.972. The influence of rainfall on watertable decline was not significant; probably due to lack of coincidence in the recharge from rainfall and discharge of water from the basins. The current betraying situation demands direct and effective government attention and intervention with the participation of communities as well to deal with. As an immediate measure; the water saving through electricity rationing seems to be the best way to slow down the water mining as a short run remedy. But in the long run; a more comprehensive sustainable groundwater management policy with the involvement of all the stakeholders is needed. In this regard; the groundwater governance and management system of Australia and other advanced countries systems can be studied to learn lessons from for policy making.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationACE 2009
Subtitle of host publication39th Proceedings
EditorsLance Fisher
Place of PublicationSydney
PublisherThe Economic Society of Australia
Pages1-11
Number of pages11
Publication statusPublished - 2010
EventAustralian Conference of Economists - Sydney, NSW, Australia
Duration: 27 Sep 201029 Sep 2010

Conference

ConferenceAustralian Conference of Economists
CountryAustralia
Period27/09/1029/09/10

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upland region
water management
rainfall
groundwater
policy making
basin
recharge
electricity
regression analysis
stakeholder
water
policy

Cite this

Khair, S., Culas, R., & Hafeez, M. (2010). The causes of groundwater decline in upland Balochistan region of Pakistan: Implication for water management policies. In L. Fisher (Ed.), ACE 2009: 39th Proceedings (pp. 1-11). Sydney: The Economic Society of Australia.
Khair, Syed ; Culas, Richard ; Hafeez, Muhammad. / The causes of groundwater decline in upland Balochistan region of Pakistan : Implication for water management policies. ACE 2009: 39th Proceedings. editor / Lance Fisher. Sydney : The Economic Society of Australia, 2010. pp. 1-11
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abstract = "Groundwater levels in the important basins of upland Balochistan are declining at an alarming rate of 2 to 3 meters annually showed by a survey results carried out in mid 2009. Various factors are responsible for this; OLS regression analysis was carried out to analyse the effects of different factors on the watertable decline by using the empirical data from different sources. The results showed that watertable decline increases with; (1) increase in the number of tubewells; (2) continuation of subsidized electric tariff policy; (3) policies of groundwater development; (4) increase in tubewell irrigated area; (5) annual average rainfall. Regression is significant for all factors except rainfall. The model explain an enormous amount of variation in watertable decline with adjusted R2 = 0.972. The influence of rainfall on watertable decline was not significant; probably due to lack of coincidence in the recharge from rainfall and discharge of water from the basins. The current betraying situation demands direct and effective government attention and intervention with the participation of communities as well to deal with. As an immediate measure; the water saving through electricity rationing seems to be the best way to slow down the water mining as a short run remedy. But in the long run; a more comprehensive sustainable groundwater management policy with the involvement of all the stakeholders is needed. In this regard; the groundwater governance and management system of Australia and other advanced countries systems can be studied to learn lessons from for policy making.",
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Khair, S, Culas, R & Hafeez, M 2010, The causes of groundwater decline in upland Balochistan region of Pakistan: Implication for water management policies. in L Fisher (ed.), ACE 2009: 39th Proceedings. The Economic Society of Australia, Sydney, pp. 1-11, Australian Conference of Economists, Australia, 27/09/10.

The causes of groundwater decline in upland Balochistan region of Pakistan : Implication for water management policies. / Khair, Syed; Culas, Richard; Hafeez, Muhammad.

ACE 2009: 39th Proceedings. ed. / Lance Fisher. Sydney : The Economic Society of Australia, 2010. p. 1-11.

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

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T1 - The causes of groundwater decline in upland Balochistan region of Pakistan

T2 - Implication for water management policies

AU - Khair, Syed

AU - Culas, Richard

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N1 - Imported on 03 May 2017 - DigiTool details were: publisher = Sydney: The Economic Society of Australia, 2010. editor/s (773b) = Lance Fisher; Event dates (773o) = 27-29 September 2010; Parent title (773t) = Australian Conference of Economists.

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

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AB - Groundwater levels in the important basins of upland Balochistan are declining at an alarming rate of 2 to 3 meters annually showed by a survey results carried out in mid 2009. Various factors are responsible for this; OLS regression analysis was carried out to analyse the effects of different factors on the watertable decline by using the empirical data from different sources. The results showed that watertable decline increases with; (1) increase in the number of tubewells; (2) continuation of subsidized electric tariff policy; (3) policies of groundwater development; (4) increase in tubewell irrigated area; (5) annual average rainfall. Regression is significant for all factors except rainfall. The model explain an enormous amount of variation in watertable decline with adjusted R2 = 0.972. The influence of rainfall on watertable decline was not significant; probably due to lack of coincidence in the recharge from rainfall and discharge of water from the basins. The current betraying situation demands direct and effective government attention and intervention with the participation of communities as well to deal with. As an immediate measure; the water saving through electricity rationing seems to be the best way to slow down the water mining as a short run remedy. But in the long run; a more comprehensive sustainable groundwater management policy with the involvement of all the stakeholders is needed. In this regard; the groundwater governance and management system of Australia and other advanced countries systems can be studied to learn lessons from for policy making.

KW - Open access version available

KW - Basin

KW - Governance

KW - Management

KW - Policy

KW - Rationing

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KW - Tariff

KW - Watertable

M3 - Conference paper

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BT - ACE 2009

A2 - Fisher, Lance

PB - The Economic Society of Australia

CY - Sydney

ER -

Khair S, Culas R, Hafeez M. The causes of groundwater decline in upland Balochistan region of Pakistan: Implication for water management policies. In Fisher L, editor, ACE 2009: 39th Proceedings. Sydney: The Economic Society of Australia. 2010. p. 1-11