The census as accounting artefact: Illustrations from the early Australian colonial period

Jayne Bisman

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

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Abstract

Carnegie and Napier (1996, p.7) call for studies in accounting history which expand or reinterpret the archive, contending that the results can provide 'insight into accounting's present and future through its past'. In this paper, the prior although limited use made of census data in accounting history studies is detailed, and a number of historical censuses examined from an accounting perspective, with particular emphasis on early colonial Australian censuses and musters. A discussion of the uses that could be made of census data in adding to the accounting archive and in informing a range of studies is developed, and is proposed as a research agenda which taps this largely unmined source of information.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication3rd International Conference on Contemporary Business
EditorsP.K. Basu, G O' O'Neill, A. Travaglione
Place of PublicationBathurst, Australia
PublisherCharles Sturt University
Pages27
Number of pages1
ISBN (Electronic)1864671777
Publication statusPublished - 2006
EventInternational Conference on Contemporary Business - Leura, NSW Australia, Australia
Duration: 21 Sep 200622 Sep 2006

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference on Contemporary Business
CountryAustralia
Period21/09/0622/09/06

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  • Cite this

    Bisman, J. (2006). The census as accounting artefact: Illustrations from the early Australian colonial period. In P. K. Basu, G. O. O'Neill, & A. Travaglione (Eds.), 3rd International Conference on Contemporary Business (pp. 27). Charles Sturt University.