The challenges of interpreting fragemented landscapes in a regional context

A case study of the Victorian box-ironbark forests, Australia.

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Abstract

Recently established protected areas in Victoria, Australia have included networks of fragmented land units, rather than the traditional model of contiguous landscapes or ecosystem types. This trend presents management challenges including the planning and development of interpretation, suggesting the need for new approaches. Using the case study of the box- ironbark (BIB) forest in central Victoria, Australia the study aimed to identify the best approach to interpreting the natural values of the BIB forest. The forest is protected through a range of parks and reserves across north east Victoria and is highly fragmented and widespread in nature and comprised of a network of degraded and recovering forest patches, presenting challenges for interpreting the forest. A review of Australian protected area management agency documents and 20 qualitative interviews with BIB forest stakeholders were completed. The study findings contribute to the practice of interpretation by identifying a number of key lessons that can be applied to interpreting other regionally based topics or ecosystems; including the importance of stakeholder engagement and development of partnerships, such as between tourism and protected area management bodies to integrate interpretation with promotion.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)971-987
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Sustainable Tourism
Volume19
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2011

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protected area
interpretation
stakeholder
management
qualitative interview
promotion
tourism
Tourism
planning
ecosystem
trend
Protected areas
Values
Ecosystem
land
document
need
natural value
ecosystem type
Planning

Cite this

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title = "The challenges of interpreting fragemented landscapes in a regional context: A case study of the Victorian box-ironbark forests, Australia.",
abstract = "Recently established protected areas in Victoria, Australia have included networks of fragmented land units, rather than the traditional model of contiguous landscapes or ecosystem types. This trend presents management challenges including the planning and development of interpretation, suggesting the need for new approaches. Using the case study of the box- ironbark (BIB) forest in central Victoria, Australia the study aimed to identify the best approach to interpreting the natural values of the BIB forest. The forest is protected through a range of parks and reserves across north east Victoria and is highly fragmented and widespread in nature and comprised of a network of degraded and recovering forest patches, presenting challenges for interpreting the forest. A review of Australian protected area management agency documents and 20 qualitative interviews with BIB forest stakeholders were completed. The study findings contribute to the practice of interpretation by identifying a number of key lessons that can be applied to interpreting other regionally based topics or ecosystems; including the importance of stakeholder engagement and development of partnerships, such as between tourism and protected area management bodies to integrate interpretation with promotion.",
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