The challenges of maintaining social work ethics in Kenya

Ndungi Mungai, Gidraph G. Wairire, Emma Rush

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This paper presents an overview of the challenges of maintaining professional social work ethics that are predominantly Western-based in an African cultural context. Social work is yet to establish a profile in most African countries and therefore the meaning and relevance of social work and social work ethics to African people is not well researched. Social workers in Kenya, for example, have to operate in a challenging social environment that includes corruption in service delivery, social norms with overlapping boundaries that could be considered contrary to Western notions of professional boundaries. The ethical dilemmas faced by practicing social workers included the extreme poverty facing their clients amidst corruption and limited referral options, playing the role of gate keepers to limited resources, inflexible rules and lack of support or supervisory structures. In addition to highlighting the challenges, the paper discusses some creative solutions that social workers could apply.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)170-186
Number of pages17
JournalEthics & Social Welfare
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2014

Fingerprint

Kenya
social work
moral philosophy
social worker
corruption
Social Norms
poverty
Social Work
Work Ethic
lack
resources
Social Workers
Africa
Corruption

Cite this

@article{3a2390f0625c4c58b98651d8a038c36b,
title = "The challenges of maintaining social work ethics in Kenya",
abstract = "This paper presents an overview of the challenges of maintaining professional social work ethics that are predominantly Western-based in an African cultural context. Social work is yet to establish a profile in most African countries and therefore the meaning and relevance of social work and social work ethics to African people is not well researched. Social workers in Kenya, for example, have to operate in a challenging social environment that includes corruption in service delivery, social norms with overlapping boundaries that could be considered contrary to Western notions of professional boundaries. The ethical dilemmas faced by practicing social workers included the extreme poverty facing their clients amidst corruption and limited referral options, playing the role of gate keepers to limited resources, inflexible rules and lack of support or supervisory structures. In addition to highlighting the challenges, the paper discusses some creative solutions that social workers could apply.",
keywords = "Africa, Afrocentricity, Dilemma, Ethics, Kenya, Teaching cases",
author = "Ndungi Mungai and Wairire, {Gidraph G.} and Emma Rush",
note = "Includes bibliographical references.",
year = "2014",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1080/17496535.2014.895401",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "170--186",
journal = "Ethics & Social Welfare",
issn = "1749-6535",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

The challenges of maintaining social work ethics in Kenya. / Mungai, Ndungi; Wairire, Gidraph G.; Rush, Emma.

In: Ethics & Social Welfare, Vol. 8, No. 2, 04.2014, p. 170-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The challenges of maintaining social work ethics in Kenya

AU - Mungai, Ndungi

AU - Wairire, Gidraph G.

AU - Rush, Emma

N1 - Includes bibliographical references.

PY - 2014/4

Y1 - 2014/4

N2 - This paper presents an overview of the challenges of maintaining professional social work ethics that are predominantly Western-based in an African cultural context. Social work is yet to establish a profile in most African countries and therefore the meaning and relevance of social work and social work ethics to African people is not well researched. Social workers in Kenya, for example, have to operate in a challenging social environment that includes corruption in service delivery, social norms with overlapping boundaries that could be considered contrary to Western notions of professional boundaries. The ethical dilemmas faced by practicing social workers included the extreme poverty facing their clients amidst corruption and limited referral options, playing the role of gate keepers to limited resources, inflexible rules and lack of support or supervisory structures. In addition to highlighting the challenges, the paper discusses some creative solutions that social workers could apply.

AB - This paper presents an overview of the challenges of maintaining professional social work ethics that are predominantly Western-based in an African cultural context. Social work is yet to establish a profile in most African countries and therefore the meaning and relevance of social work and social work ethics to African people is not well researched. Social workers in Kenya, for example, have to operate in a challenging social environment that includes corruption in service delivery, social norms with overlapping boundaries that could be considered contrary to Western notions of professional boundaries. The ethical dilemmas faced by practicing social workers included the extreme poverty facing their clients amidst corruption and limited referral options, playing the role of gate keepers to limited resources, inflexible rules and lack of support or supervisory structures. In addition to highlighting the challenges, the paper discusses some creative solutions that social workers could apply.

KW - Africa

KW - Afrocentricity

KW - Dilemma

KW - Ethics

KW - Kenya

KW - Teaching cases

U2 - 10.1080/17496535.2014.895401

DO - 10.1080/17496535.2014.895401

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - 170

EP - 186

JO - Ethics & Social Welfare

JF - Ethics & Social Welfare

SN - 1749-6535

IS - 2

ER -