The Changing Nature of Communities: Implications for Police and Community Policing

Isabelle Bartkowiak-Theron, Anna Corbo Crehan

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperChapter

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Abstract

Clearly, the concept of community is intrinsic to community policing. But few criminological or policing works go beyond recognising that communities are a complex phenomenon (or, indeed, phenomena). Little consideration is given as to how exactly communities have changed over time and how, in response, community policing has had to change and adapt. This chapter is a modest attempt at filling this gap. It will briefly survey the evolution of communities as social entities and show how their changing characteristics have impacted on police work. Building on a comprehensive and modern typology of communities, how police have adapted their understandings of community policing to recognise and work with these modern realities will be explored.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCommunity policing in Australia
EditorsJudy Putt
Place of PublicationCanberra
PublisherAIC
Pages9-15
Number of pages7
ISBN (Electronic)9781921532733
ISBN (Print) 9781921532726
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Publication series

NameAIC Reports, Research and Public Policy Series 111
PublisherAustralian Institute of Criminology

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  • Cite this

    Bartkowiak-Theron, I., & Corbo Crehan, A. (2010). The Changing Nature of Communities: Implications for Police and Community Policing. In J. Putt (Ed.), Community policing in Australia (pp. 9-15). [2] (AIC Reports, Research and Public Policy Series 111). AIC.