The constant gardener revisited: The effect of social blackmail on the marketing concept, innovation, and entrepreneurship

Morgan P. Miles, Linda S. Munilla, Jeffrey G. Covin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper discusses how adoption of the social dimensions of the marketing concept may unintentionally restrict innovation and corporate entrepreneurship, ultimately reducing social welfare. The impact of social marketing on innovation and entrepreneurship is discussed using the case of multinational pharmaceutical firms that are under pressure when marketing HIV treatments in poor countries. The argument this paper supports is that social welfare may eventually be diminished if forced social responsibility is imposed. The case of providing subsidized AIDS medication to less developed nations is used to illustrate how social blackmail may result in less innovation, entrepreneurship, and product development efforts by the pharmaceutical industry, ultimately reducing social welfare.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)287-295
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Business Ethics
Volume41
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

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