The Continuing Myth of Educational Reform

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

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Abstract

When schools and school systems adopt reform programs, the values and meanings inherent in those programs create and perpetuate powerful forms of discourse that characterize the projects themselves, evoke loyalty and commitment. This paper proposes that genuine school improvement requires one to step outside the circle of discourse engendered by reform programs that promote a 'single minded' discourse about themselves and what schools should do. When schools are expected to accept particular programs in their entirety, an 'officially' sanctioned way of thinking about school reform and teaching is created and perpetuated. Proponents of reform programs may argue that such sanctions are a necessary feature of whole school reform as they provide a focus for energy and activism, for winning people's support, and for conveying to parents and the wider school community a sense of purposeful action and rational planning. However, these dominant discourses seem to obscure other perspectives, disallowing critique and preventing reflective discourse and analysis. Indeed, this paper holds that genuine school reform requires schools to break out of the imprisonment of dominant discourses and remain open to critical reflection. This paper challenges popular conceptions that school reform programs inherently engender school improvement
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAARE2007
Subtitle of host publicationEducation, Innovation and Research: Strategies for capacity-building
EditorsPeter Jeffery
Place of PublicationAustralia
PublisherAARE
Pages30 pgs
Publication statusPublished - 2007
EventAustralian Association for Research in Education International Education Research Conference: AARE 2007 - Adelaide, Australia, Adelaide, Australia
Duration: 27 Nov 200730 Nov 2007

Conference

ConferenceAustralian Association for Research in Education International Education Research Conference
CountryAustralia
CityAdelaide
Period27/11/0730/11/07

Fingerprint

educational reform
myth
reform program
school reform
discourse
school
school program
imprisonment
school system
loyalty
sanction
parents
commitment
energy
planning
Teaching
community
Values

Cite this

Rafferty, J. (2007). The Continuing Myth of Educational Reform. In P. Jeffery (Ed.), AARE2007: Education, Innovation and Research: Strategies for capacity-building (pp. 30 pgs). Australia: AARE.
Rafferty, John. / The Continuing Myth of Educational Reform. AARE2007: Education, Innovation and Research: Strategies for capacity-building. editor / Peter Jeffery. Australia : AARE, 2007. pp. 30 pgs
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Rafferty, J 2007, The Continuing Myth of Educational Reform. in P Jeffery (ed.), AARE2007: Education, Innovation and Research: Strategies for capacity-building. AARE, Australia, pp. 30 pgs, Australian Association for Research in Education International Education Research Conference, Adelaide, Australia, 27/11/07.

The Continuing Myth of Educational Reform. / Rafferty, John.

AARE2007: Education, Innovation and Research: Strategies for capacity-building. ed. / Peter Jeffery. Australia : AARE, 2007. p. 30 pgs.

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

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AB - When schools and school systems adopt reform programs, the values and meanings inherent in those programs create and perpetuate powerful forms of discourse that characterize the projects themselves, evoke loyalty and commitment. This paper proposes that genuine school improvement requires one to step outside the circle of discourse engendered by reform programs that promote a 'single minded' discourse about themselves and what schools should do. When schools are expected to accept particular programs in their entirety, an 'officially' sanctioned way of thinking about school reform and teaching is created and perpetuated. Proponents of reform programs may argue that such sanctions are a necessary feature of whole school reform as they provide a focus for energy and activism, for winning people's support, and for conveying to parents and the wider school community a sense of purposeful action and rational planning. However, these dominant discourses seem to obscure other perspectives, disallowing critique and preventing reflective discourse and analysis. Indeed, this paper holds that genuine school reform requires schools to break out of the imprisonment of dominant discourses and remain open to critical reflection. This paper challenges popular conceptions that school reform programs inherently engender school improvement

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Rafferty J. The Continuing Myth of Educational Reform. In Jeffery P, editor, AARE2007: Education, Innovation and Research: Strategies for capacity-building. Australia: AARE. 2007. p. 30 pgs