The E. Coli Load In Self-Managed Rural Water In Australia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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37 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Access to clean drinking water is taken for granted in most developed nations where many think water quality is a third-world issue. However, for residents of rural Australia water quality is an emerging issue. Our research of drinking water quality, harvesting and management practices of rural NSW residents found that a substantial number of these consumers may be risking their health whenever they turn on their tap. More than half of the tank water sampled failed to meet the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines for safe drinking water. Levels of E. coli were up to 230x more than the acceptable levels proposed by the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines. Qualitative research found most consumers were unaware of the risks associated with drinking raw rainwater. Further, few took steps to minimise their risk through accepted water management practices.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalInternet Journal of Microbiology
Volume9
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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Drinking Water
Escherichia coli
Water Quality
Water
Practice Management
Guidelines
Qualitative Research
Developed Countries
Drinking
Health
Research

Cite this

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title = "The E. Coli Load In Self-Managed Rural Water In Australia",
abstract = "Access to clean drinking water is taken for granted in most developed nations where many think water quality is a third-world issue. However, for residents of rural Australia water quality is an emerging issue. Our research of drinking water quality, harvesting and management practices of rural NSW residents found that a substantial number of these consumers may be risking their health whenever they turn on their tap. More than half of the tank water sampled failed to meet the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines for safe drinking water. Levels of E. coli were up to 230x more than the acceptable levels proposed by the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines. Qualitative research found most consumers were unaware of the risks associated with drinking raw rainwater. Further, few took steps to minimise their risk through accepted water management practices.",
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The E. Coli Load In Self-Managed Rural Water In Australia. / Crampton, Andrea; Ragusa, Angela.

In: Internet Journal of Microbiology, Vol. 9, No. 1, 2010, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Crampton, Andrea

AU - Ragusa, Angela

N1 - Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = The Internet Journal of Microbiology. ISSNs: 1937-8289;

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AB - Access to clean drinking water is taken for granted in most developed nations where many think water quality is a third-world issue. However, for residents of rural Australia water quality is an emerging issue. Our research of drinking water quality, harvesting and management practices of rural NSW residents found that a substantial number of these consumers may be risking their health whenever they turn on their tap. More than half of the tank water sampled failed to meet the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines for safe drinking water. Levels of E. coli were up to 230x more than the acceptable levels proposed by the Australian Drinking Water Guidelines. Qualitative research found most consumers were unaware of the risks associated with drinking raw rainwater. Further, few took steps to minimise their risk through accepted water management practices.

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