The effect of context on problem-based learning

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Abstract

contexts. Within the second year PBL groups, the most commonly occurring behaviours were use of resources (10%), answering the tutors’ question (10%), making a suggestion (10%), making a comment (10%) and answering a students’ question (8%). In the third year groups observed, the most common behaviours were asking a question (11%), making a suggestion (10%) and answering a students’ question (9%). These behaviours will be explained in the presentation in light of the rationale for the different PBL structures and interview results, which showed apathy for PBL in third year due to a variety of factors, but mostly due to the competing demands placed on them in the clinical environment. This presentation will also contrast the student behaviours with those of the tutor.Conclusion: The context in which PBL is implemented must be taken into consideration in any planning of PBL curricula. External factors such as other learning activities, demands on time, lack of clear expectations, assessment, and desire to be a part of a professional community of practice, have a significant impact on motivation for learning in PBL tutorials and cause tension. It is hoped that this research will promote a reconsideration of the style of PBL which has operated for over 8 years in some medical schools without change.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationReinventing PBL
EditorsGlenn O' O'Grady
Place of PublicationSingapore, Republic of Singapore
PublisherCentre for Educational Development, Republic Polytechnic
Pages210-211
Number of pages2
ISBN (Electronic)9789810577186
Publication statusPublished - 2007
EventInternational PBL Symposium 2007 - Singapore, Singapore, Singapore
Duration: 07 Mar 200709 Mar 2007

Conference

ConferenceInternational PBL Symposium 2007
CountrySingapore
Period07/03/0709/03/07

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    Hyde, S. J. (2007). The effect of context on problem-based learning. In G. O. O'Grady (Ed.), Reinventing PBL (pp. 210-211). Centre for Educational Development, Republic Polytechnic.