The effects of playing Nintendo Wii on depression, sense of belonging and social support in Australian aged care residents: a protocol study of a mixed methods intervention trial

Jessica Chesler, Suzanne McLaren, Britt Klein, Shaun Watson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: The proportion of people aged 65 or older is the fastest growing age group worldwide. Older adults in aged care facilities have higher levels of depression, and lower levels of social support and sense of belonging compared with older adults living in the community. Research has begun to assess the effectiveness of interventions to improve the mental health of residents and has found both cognitive and physical benefits of video game playing. The benefits of playing these games in a group may also lead to greater social interaction and decreased loneliness. The current study aims to investigate an intervention program designed to foster relationships among older adults in care based on shared interests. Residents will be assessed on the effectiveness of a 6 week program of playing Wii bowling in comparison to a control group. Method/Design: Participants will be allocated to the intervention (Wii bowling) or the control group based on their place of residence. Participants in the intervention group will be invited to participate in Wii bowling twice weekly, with up to three other residents for a period of 6 weeks. Residents in both conditions will be assessed for depression, social support, sense of belonging, and current self-rated mood at pre-intervention (0 weeks), post-intervention (6 weeks), and at 2-month follow up (14 weeks). Qualitative data on social interaction between group members will also be collected at weeks 1, 3, and 6. Both groups will receive a Wii console after week 6 to establish if residents and staff engage with the Wii without intervention. Discussion: The Wii provides a user friendly platform for older adults to use video games, and it incorporates both social and competitive aspects in the game play. Existing research has not extensively investigated the social aspects of using this type of technology with older adults. If found to be effective, incorporating Wii games into an activity schedule may benefit the mental health of older adults living in care by establishing an intervention that is fun, economical, and easy to use. Trial Registry: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12614000445673.

Original languageEnglish
Article number107
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalBMC Geriatrics
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 03 Sep 2015

Fingerprint

Video Games
Interpersonal Relations
Social Support
Registries
Mental Health
Depression
Loneliness
Control Groups
New Zealand
Research
Appointments and Schedules
Age Groups
Clinical Trials
Technology

Cite this

@article{146d4c9ba6ad438cb6a40a1461938f55,
title = "The effects of playing Nintendo Wii on depression, sense of belonging and social support in Australian aged care residents: a protocol study of a mixed methods intervention trial",
abstract = "Background: The proportion of people aged 65 or older is the fastest growing age group worldwide. Older adults in aged care facilities have higher levels of depression, and lower levels of social support and sense of belonging compared with older adults living in the community. Research has begun to assess the effectiveness of interventions to improve the mental health of residents and has found both cognitive and physical benefits of video game playing. The benefits of playing these games in a group may also lead to greater social interaction and decreased loneliness. The current study aims to investigate an intervention program designed to foster relationships among older adults in care based on shared interests. Residents will be assessed on the effectiveness of a 6 week program of playing Wii bowling in comparison to a control group. Method/Design: Participants will be allocated to the intervention (Wii bowling) or the control group based on their place of residence. Participants in the intervention group will be invited to participate in Wii bowling twice weekly, with up to three other residents for a period of 6 weeks. Residents in both conditions will be assessed for depression, social support, sense of belonging, and current self-rated mood at pre-intervention (0 weeks), post-intervention (6 weeks), and at 2-month follow up (14 weeks). Qualitative data on social interaction between group members will also be collected at weeks 1, 3, and 6. Both groups will receive a Wii console after week 6 to establish if residents and staff engage with the Wii without intervention. Discussion: The Wii provides a user friendly platform for older adults to use video games, and it incorporates both social and competitive aspects in the game play. Existing research has not extensively investigated the social aspects of using this type of technology with older adults. If found to be effective, incorporating Wii games into an activity schedule may benefit the mental health of older adults living in care by establishing an intervention that is fun, economical, and easy to use. Trial Registry: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12614000445673.",
author = "Jessica Chesler and Suzanne McLaren and Britt Klein and Shaun Watson",
year = "2015",
month = "9",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1186/s12877-015-0107-z",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "1--8",
journal = "BMC Geriatrics",
issn = "1471-2318",
publisher = "BioMed Central Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

The effects of playing Nintendo Wii on depression, sense of belonging and social support in Australian aged care residents : a protocol study of a mixed methods intervention trial. / Chesler, Jessica; McLaren, Suzanne; Klein, Britt; Watson, Shaun.

In: BMC Geriatrics, Vol. 15, No. 1, 107, 03.09.2015, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effects of playing Nintendo Wii on depression, sense of belonging and social support in Australian aged care residents

T2 - a protocol study of a mixed methods intervention trial

AU - Chesler, Jessica

AU - McLaren, Suzanne

AU - Klein, Britt

AU - Watson, Shaun

PY - 2015/9/3

Y1 - 2015/9/3

N2 - Background: The proportion of people aged 65 or older is the fastest growing age group worldwide. Older adults in aged care facilities have higher levels of depression, and lower levels of social support and sense of belonging compared with older adults living in the community. Research has begun to assess the effectiveness of interventions to improve the mental health of residents and has found both cognitive and physical benefits of video game playing. The benefits of playing these games in a group may also lead to greater social interaction and decreased loneliness. The current study aims to investigate an intervention program designed to foster relationships among older adults in care based on shared interests. Residents will be assessed on the effectiveness of a 6 week program of playing Wii bowling in comparison to a control group. Method/Design: Participants will be allocated to the intervention (Wii bowling) or the control group based on their place of residence. Participants in the intervention group will be invited to participate in Wii bowling twice weekly, with up to three other residents for a period of 6 weeks. Residents in both conditions will be assessed for depression, social support, sense of belonging, and current self-rated mood at pre-intervention (0 weeks), post-intervention (6 weeks), and at 2-month follow up (14 weeks). Qualitative data on social interaction between group members will also be collected at weeks 1, 3, and 6. Both groups will receive a Wii console after week 6 to establish if residents and staff engage with the Wii without intervention. Discussion: The Wii provides a user friendly platform for older adults to use video games, and it incorporates both social and competitive aspects in the game play. Existing research has not extensively investigated the social aspects of using this type of technology with older adults. If found to be effective, incorporating Wii games into an activity schedule may benefit the mental health of older adults living in care by establishing an intervention that is fun, economical, and easy to use. Trial Registry: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12614000445673.

AB - Background: The proportion of people aged 65 or older is the fastest growing age group worldwide. Older adults in aged care facilities have higher levels of depression, and lower levels of social support and sense of belonging compared with older adults living in the community. Research has begun to assess the effectiveness of interventions to improve the mental health of residents and has found both cognitive and physical benefits of video game playing. The benefits of playing these games in a group may also lead to greater social interaction and decreased loneliness. The current study aims to investigate an intervention program designed to foster relationships among older adults in care based on shared interests. Residents will be assessed on the effectiveness of a 6 week program of playing Wii bowling in comparison to a control group. Method/Design: Participants will be allocated to the intervention (Wii bowling) or the control group based on their place of residence. Participants in the intervention group will be invited to participate in Wii bowling twice weekly, with up to three other residents for a period of 6 weeks. Residents in both conditions will be assessed for depression, social support, sense of belonging, and current self-rated mood at pre-intervention (0 weeks), post-intervention (6 weeks), and at 2-month follow up (14 weeks). Qualitative data on social interaction between group members will also be collected at weeks 1, 3, and 6. Both groups will receive a Wii console after week 6 to establish if residents and staff engage with the Wii without intervention. Discussion: The Wii provides a user friendly platform for older adults to use video games, and it incorporates both social and competitive aspects in the game play. Existing research has not extensively investigated the social aspects of using this type of technology with older adults. If found to be effective, incorporating Wii games into an activity schedule may benefit the mental health of older adults living in care by establishing an intervention that is fun, economical, and easy to use. Trial Registry: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12614000445673.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84941172481&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84941172481&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s12877-015-0107-z

DO - 10.1186/s12877-015-0107-z

M3 - Article

C2 - 26336883

AN - SCOPUS:84941172481

VL - 15

SP - 1

EP - 8

JO - BMC Geriatrics

JF - BMC Geriatrics

SN - 1471-2318

IS - 1

M1 - 107

ER -