The experiences of reporting sexism toward female paramedics in Australian ambulance services: A scoping review

Alexandra Cassidy, Brooke Hunt, Alisha McFarlane, Bronwyn Beovich

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Abstract

Paramedicine in Australia was historically male-dominated, and despite the development within the profession, sexism against women remains a major hurdle for a safe workplace. The aim of this scoping review was to identify experiences of reporting sexism toward female paramedics in Australian ambulance services and identify barriers impacting the decision to submit a report. Literature searches were conducted using eight electronic databases, with grey literature found through Google Scholar, media outlets and hand-searching. Articles included were those with mention of sexism or associated behaviours reported to a senior authority within the field of paramedicine in Australia. Reporting of sexism within paramedicine was not a primary outcome for any included literature. Behaviours such as sexual assault and harassment are rarely defined, and sexism is often not reported independently. Experiences of women with reporting are primarily negative, and decisions to report sexism are made difficult by various barriers of which victimisation was most prominent. Following a report being lodged, all reported outcomes were inadequate as perceived by the victim. Further research into the reporting of sexism in Australian ambulance services is required to develop resolutions to the identified barriers and provide a safer reporting environment to encourage reporting
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Social Issues
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 03 Oct 2023

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