The impact of an Australian Mistletoe, Amyema Miquelii (Loranthaceae), on nutrient cycling in Eucalypt forests and woodlands

Wendy Anne March

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    94 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    The importance of nutrient cycling in regulating ecosystem processes has long been recognised; however, the role of parasitic plants has been largely ignored. This thesis documents the significant effect a hemiparasitic mistletoe, Amyema miquelii (Lehm. ex Miq.) Tiegh., can have a nutrient cycling in red gum woodlands (Eucalyptus blakelyi, E. dwyer, and E. dealbata) and red gum dominated forests of south-eastern Australia. Litter is one of the main routes for the transfer of nutrients from the plant to soil in the nutrient cycle (Adams & Attiwill, 1986) and as such is the topic of this study. The aim was to assess the effect of mistletoe presence in the tree canopy on litterfall and nutrient transfers in the leaf litter, then on the soil via decomposition, and the subsequent effects on the plant community.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Awarding Institution
    • Charles Sturt University
    Supervisors/Advisors
    • Watson, David, Principal Supervisor
    • Wilson, Ben, Co-Supervisor, External person
    Award date24 Mar 2007
    Place of PublicationAustralia
    Publisher
    Publication statusPublished - 2007

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