The influence of fairness on university student satisfaction

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Some researchers have argued that a better understanding of fairness would add to our evaluation of learning environments (Lizzio, Wilson & Hadaway, 2007) and their impact on students (Nesbit & Burton, 2006), but there have been few studies that explicitly examine perception of fairness as a driver of satisfaction with learning environments. This study examined the influence of perceptions of fairness on student satisfaction with a subject, the competence of lecturers, and the university. Students (n=396) from education, arts, management, health and science faculties in one Australian university completed a survey that measured perceptions of fairness and service quality. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify distinct factor concepts. Regression was used to explore the influence of five service quality factors (Reliable, Assurances, Responsiveness, Tangibility, Empathy), adapted from SERVQUAL (Parasuraman, Zeithaml, & Berry, 1988), and two fairness factors (Respectful Partnership, Systemic fairness), adapted from FLEQ (Lizzio et al., 2007), on student feelings of satisfaction with the subject, lecturers, and the university as a whole. The two fairness factors were found to be distinct from the service quality factors. ‘Respectful partnership’ significantly and positively influenced all the satisfaction levels and was the strongest influence on subject satisfaction.This finding is important because it shows that an understanding of fairness offers a more complete understanding of the student experience. Some aspects of the learning environment that are evidently highly valued by students, such as voice in decisions about learning and the quality of the relationship with the lecturer, may not presently be captured by instruments used to evaluate learning environments. The paper suggests that fairness dimensions be further explored, and integrated in design and evaluation of the student experience.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of Assessment and Evaluation
Volume19
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

fairness
university
student
learning environment
university teacher
art education
evaluation
empathy
health promotion
factor analysis
experience
driver
regression
science
learning

Cite this

@article{ad89b16929f6466192cac84f357c1c78,
title = "The influence of fairness on university student satisfaction",
abstract = "Some researchers have argued that a better understanding of fairness would add to our evaluation of learning environments (Lizzio, Wilson & Hadaway, 2007) and their impact on students (Nesbit & Burton, 2006), but there have been few studies that explicitly examine perception of fairness as a driver of satisfaction with learning environments. This study examined the influence of perceptions of fairness on student satisfaction with a subject, the competence of lecturers, and the university. Students (n=396) from education, arts, management, health and science faculties in one Australian university completed a survey that measured perceptions of fairness and service quality. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify distinct factor concepts. Regression was used to explore the influence of five service quality factors (Reliable, Assurances, Responsiveness, Tangibility, Empathy), adapted from SERVQUAL (Parasuraman, Zeithaml, & Berry, 1988), and two fairness factors (Respectful Partnership, Systemic fairness), adapted from FLEQ (Lizzio et al., 2007), on student feelings of satisfaction with the subject, lecturers, and the university as a whole. The two fairness factors were found to be distinct from the service quality factors. {\~A}¢{\^A}€{\^A}˜Respectful partnership{\~A}¢{\^A}€{\^A}™ significantly and positively influenced all the satisfaction levels and was the strongest influence on subject satisfaction.This finding is important because it shows that an understanding of fairness offers a more complete understanding of the student experience. Some aspects of the learning environment that are evidently highly valued by students, such as voice in decisions about learning and the quality of the relationship with the lecturer, may not presently be captured by instruments used to evaluate learning environments. The paper suggests that fairness dimensions be further explored, and integrated in design and evaluation of the student experience.",
keywords = "Open access version available, Course, Fairness, Interactional, Justice, Lecturer, Partnership, Procedural, Regression, Respectful, Servqual, Student satisfaction, Subject, Systemic, Teacher, University",
author = "Peter Denyer-Simmons and David Dowell and Felicity Small",
note = "Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = International Journal of assessment and Evaluation. ISSNs: 2327-8692;",
year = "2013",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "1--16",
journal = "International Journal of Assessment and Evaluation",
issn = "2327-7920",
publisher = "Common Ground Publishing",
number = "1",

}

The influence of fairness on university student satisfaction. / Denyer-Simmons, Peter; Dowell, David; Small, Felicity.

In: International Journal of Assessment and Evaluation, Vol. 19, No. 1, 2013, p. 1-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The influence of fairness on university student satisfaction

AU - Denyer-Simmons, Peter

AU - Dowell, David

AU - Small, Felicity

N1 - Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = International Journal of assessment and Evaluation. ISSNs: 2327-8692;

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Some researchers have argued that a better understanding of fairness would add to our evaluation of learning environments (Lizzio, Wilson & Hadaway, 2007) and their impact on students (Nesbit & Burton, 2006), but there have been few studies that explicitly examine perception of fairness as a driver of satisfaction with learning environments. This study examined the influence of perceptions of fairness on student satisfaction with a subject, the competence of lecturers, and the university. Students (n=396) from education, arts, management, health and science faculties in one Australian university completed a survey that measured perceptions of fairness and service quality. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify distinct factor concepts. Regression was used to explore the influence of five service quality factors (Reliable, Assurances, Responsiveness, Tangibility, Empathy), adapted from SERVQUAL (Parasuraman, Zeithaml, & Berry, 1988), and two fairness factors (Respectful Partnership, Systemic fairness), adapted from FLEQ (Lizzio et al., 2007), on student feelings of satisfaction with the subject, lecturers, and the university as a whole. The two fairness factors were found to be distinct from the service quality factors. ‘Respectful partnership’ significantly and positively influenced all the satisfaction levels and was the strongest influence on subject satisfaction.This finding is important because it shows that an understanding of fairness offers a more complete understanding of the student experience. Some aspects of the learning environment that are evidently highly valued by students, such as voice in decisions about learning and the quality of the relationship with the lecturer, may not presently be captured by instruments used to evaluate learning environments. The paper suggests that fairness dimensions be further explored, and integrated in design and evaluation of the student experience.

AB - Some researchers have argued that a better understanding of fairness would add to our evaluation of learning environments (Lizzio, Wilson & Hadaway, 2007) and their impact on students (Nesbit & Burton, 2006), but there have been few studies that explicitly examine perception of fairness as a driver of satisfaction with learning environments. This study examined the influence of perceptions of fairness on student satisfaction with a subject, the competence of lecturers, and the university. Students (n=396) from education, arts, management, health and science faculties in one Australian university completed a survey that measured perceptions of fairness and service quality. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify distinct factor concepts. Regression was used to explore the influence of five service quality factors (Reliable, Assurances, Responsiveness, Tangibility, Empathy), adapted from SERVQUAL (Parasuraman, Zeithaml, & Berry, 1988), and two fairness factors (Respectful Partnership, Systemic fairness), adapted from FLEQ (Lizzio et al., 2007), on student feelings of satisfaction with the subject, lecturers, and the university as a whole. The two fairness factors were found to be distinct from the service quality factors. ‘Respectful partnership’ significantly and positively influenced all the satisfaction levels and was the strongest influence on subject satisfaction.This finding is important because it shows that an understanding of fairness offers a more complete understanding of the student experience. Some aspects of the learning environment that are evidently highly valued by students, such as voice in decisions about learning and the quality of the relationship with the lecturer, may not presently be captured by instruments used to evaluate learning environments. The paper suggests that fairness dimensions be further explored, and integrated in design and evaluation of the student experience.

KW - Open access version available

KW - Course

KW - Fairness

KW - Interactional

KW - Justice

KW - Lecturer

KW - Partnership

KW - Procedural

KW - Regression

KW - Respectful

KW - Servqual

KW - Student satisfaction

KW - Subject

KW - Systemic

KW - Teacher

KW - University

M3 - Article

VL - 19

SP - 1

EP - 16

JO - International Journal of Assessment and Evaluation

JF - International Journal of Assessment and Evaluation

SN - 2327-7920

IS - 1

ER -