The masked educator-innovative simulation in an Australian undergraduate Medical Sonography and Medical Imaging program

Kerry Reid-Searl, Anita Bowman, Margaret McAllister, Margaret Cowling, Kelly Spuur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract


Introduction

Clinical learning experiences for sonography and medical imaging students can sometimes involve the practice of technical procedures with less of a focus on developing communication skills with patients. Whilst patient‐based simulation scenarios have been widely reported in other health education programmes, there is a paucity of research in sonography and medical imaging.

The aim of this study was to explore the effectiveness of Mask‐Ed™ (KRS Simulation) in the learning and teaching of clinical communication skills to undergraduate medical sonography and medical imaging students. Mask‐Ed™ (KRS Simulation) is a simulation technique where the educator is hidden behind wearable realistic silicone body props including masks.
Methods

Focus group interviews were conducted with 11 undergraduate medical sonography and medical imaging students at CQUniversity, Australia. The number of participants was limited to the size of the cohort of students enrolled in the course. Prior to these interviews participants were engaged in learning activities that featured the use of the Mask‐Ed™ (KRS Simulation) method. Thematic analysis was employed to explore how the introduction of Mask‐Ed™ (KRS Simulation) contributed to students' learning in relation to clinical communication skills.
Results

Key themes included: benefits of interacting with someone real rather than another student, learning made fun, awareness of empathy, therapeutic communication skills, engaged problem solving and purposeful reflection.
Conclusions

Mask‐Ed™ (KRS Simulation) combined with interactive sessions with an expert facilitator, contributed positively to students' learning in relation to clinical communication skills. Participants believed that interacting with someone real, as in the Mask‐Ed characters was beneficial. In addition to the learning being described as fun, participants gained an awareness of empathy, therapeutic communication skills, engaged problem solving and purposeful reflection.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)233-240
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Medical Radiation Sciences
Volume61
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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