The native versus alien dichotomy: Relative impact of native noisy miners and introduced common mynas

Kathryn Haythorpe, Darren Burke, Danielle Sulikowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human activity can dramatically affect biodiversity, often by introducing non-native species, or by increasing the abundance of a small number of native species. Management strategies aimed at conserving biodiversity need to be informed by the actual impacts of highly abundant species, whether native or introduced. In this study we examined characteristics of two bird species, introduced common mynas and native noisy miners, both of which are highly abundant in urbanised areas along the East coast of Australia. Current managerial practices have a strong focus on eradication of common mynas, while noisy miners are largely ignored. However, in this study noisy miners were found in a broader range of habitats, and in greater abundance, than common mynas; displayed more aggressive behaviour; and were linked to a decline in the diversity and abundance of other species where common mynas were not. We suggest that the adaptability of a species and the variety of habitats it can colonise may be a better predictor of its potential impact, than whether it is native or introduced.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1659-1674
Number of pages16
JournalBiological Invasions
Volume16
Issue number8
Early online date2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2014

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The native versus alien dichotomy: Relative impact of native noisy miners and introduced common mynas'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this