The New South Wales campaign for improved staff ratios for babies in centre-based ECEC (2002-2009): Influences on politicians' decisions

Kathryn Bown

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)
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    Abstract

    This article presents findings from a case study investigation of a longstanding campaign in one Australian state to change the minimum regulated staff-child ratios for babies from one staff member for every five babies (1:5) to one staff member for every four (1:4). Using interviews with early childhood professionals and politicians, and document analysis of key policy texts, an 'eventalization' (Foucault, 1991) is generated to argue multiple 'contingent events' (Mills, 2003, p. 115) at the state, national and international level, enabled ratio campaign activists to intensively promote the 1:4 ratio. Simultaneously New South Wales politicians strategically aligned themselves with national early childhood education and care policy by approving 1:4. The article concludes with a discussion of the findings and implications for ECEC activists agitating for policy change in the future.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)97-104
    Number of pages8
    JournalAustralasian Journal of Early Childhood
    Volume38
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2013

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