The occurrence and abundance of infective stages of zoonotic nematodes in selected edible fish sold in Australian fish markets

Jaydipbhai Suthar, Shokoofeh Shamsi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Seafood is nutritious and a healthy source of proteins and its regular consumption is highly recommended by medical professionals and dieticians. Owing to this, the global consumption of seafood per capita has been significantly increasing since the 1960s. Consequently, seafood-borne pathogens, including parasites, have also become more widely known and recognised. In Australia, a vast island country, information about such parasites is extremely limited. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and abundance of zoonotic parasites, including anisakid nematodes, in selected Australian edible fish. Four species of fish, namely tiger flathead, Platycephalus richardsoni (n = 43), blue mackerel, Scomber australasicus (n = 117), snapper, Pagrus auratus (n = 11) and school whiting, Sillago flindersi (n = 90) were purchased from a fish market. Although a range of parasites was found, due to their significance for human health, the focus of this study was on nematodes whose infectious stage was found in these fish. The prevalence of nematodes in these fish species was 86.05%, 64.10%, 45.45% and 56.67%, respectively. Among the parasites found, Anisakis spp., Contracaecum spp. and Hysterothylacium spp. in tiger flathead, blue mackerel and school whiting, might be of zoonotic importance. Our findings suggest there is a need to revise current seafood safety protocols and develop educational campaigns for seafood industries stakeholders.

Original languageEnglish
Article number104833
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalMicrobial Pathogenesis
Volume154
Early online date10 Mar 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2021

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