The relationship between geographic remoteness and intentions to use a telephone support service among australian men following radical prostatectomy

Denise Corboy, Suzanne McLaren, Megan Jenkins, John McDonald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The objective is to investigate the influence of characteristics related to place of residence (self-reliance and stoicism) on men's intentions to use a telephone support service following radical prostatectomy.Methods: A community sample of 447 prostate cancer patients (31% response), recruited via Medicare Australia, completed a survey to assess levels of self-reliance and stoicism, and beliefs about addressing emotional distress through using telephone support services.Results: Results indicated that the model was a partially mediated model. Geographic remoteness was directly related to intention, and indirectly related through stoicism and subjective norms.Conclusion: Men from rural and remote areas in Australia might face particular challenges in seeking support following treatment for prostate cancer. These challenges appear to relate to the influence of stoic attitudes and normative expectations, than to issues of access and availability. Addressing stoic attitudes in the clinical setting, through normalising emotional reactions to cancer diagnosis and treatment, and the act of help-seeking for emotional support, may be beneficial.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1259-1266
Number of pages8
JournalPsycho-Oncology
Volume23
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Nov 2014

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Prostatectomy
Telephone
Prostatic Neoplasms
Medicare
Therapeutics
Neoplasms

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The relationship between geographic remoteness and intentions to use a telephone support service among australian men following radical prostatectomy. / Corboy, Denise; McLaren, Suzanne; Jenkins, Megan; McDonald, John.

In: Psycho-Oncology, Vol. 23, No. 11, 01.11.2014, p. 1259-1266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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