The relationship between pre-election reports in New Zealand local governments and voter turnout

Bikram Chatterjee, Ross Taplin, Nicholas Pawsey, Mary Low, Grantley Taylor

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperChapter (peer-reviewed)

Abstract

This chapter investigates the relationship between the introduction of pre-election reports in New Zealand local governments and voter turnout. Since 2013, New Zealand local governments have been required to prepare a summary report before upcoming elections, in addition to their annual reports, with the purpose of informing voters about the performance of local governments. This study shows that the introduction of pre-election reports is not related to voter turnout, with the mean actually decreasing in the year the new reporting requirement came into effect (2013) when compared to the previous voting year (2010). This raises concerns about the effect of required reports on voters. Using rational choice theory, the chapter contributes to existing literature by investigating the effect of this additional accountability mechanism on voter turnout. The findings will also contribute to practice by way of additional mechanisms for local government accountability.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPublic sector accounting, accountability and governance
Subtitle of host publicationGlobalising the experiences of Australia and New Zealand
EditorsRobyn Pilcher, David Gilchrist
Place of PublicationLondon, UK
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter6
Pages67-79
Number of pages13
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9781315121727, 9781351349178
ISBN (Print)9781138563384
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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