The Role of Extension in Natural Resource Management: the Australian experience

    Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperChapter

    Abstract

    This chapter expands on the role of extension in achieving sustainable management of Australia's natural resources. The first section describes how extension has evolved since the 1930s to address natural resource management (NRM) issues in Australia. Extension in natural resource management has moved from a single focus on soil and water conservation to tackle a wider range of environmental problems associated with agriculture, urban development, forestry and fisheries. This move has been driven by changing government and community priorities concerned with the erosion of public good assets (eg. vegetation, wildlife, biodiversity, water quality, wetlands, old growth forests etc). Extension for NRM also changed from individual property planning and on-ground works, to addressing problems at a catchment scale with coordinated action. Changes in extension priorities and approaches could be seen to have been reactive instead of proactive towards the unfolding crisis of land degradation. This may have been the case early on with the transition from production based extension to NRM extension. However, the second section in this chapter illustrates how NRM extension approaches and methods have become more integrated, participatory and knowledge intensive over time, in a bid to get ahead of land degradation problems.Fuelled by government funding and community support, regional NRM organisations have formed partnerships with private industry, local government and community groups to take on a greater role in extension. Hidden behind different programs, titles, funding arrangements, and job descriptions, NRM extension is varied but also has commonalities. These differences and similarities are highlighted using examples from across Australia.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationShaping Change
    Subtitle of host publicationNatural Resource Management, Agriculture and the Role of Extension
    Place of PublicationAustralia
    PublisherAPEN
    Pages79-84
    Number of pages6
    Edition2.3
    ISBN (Print)9780957703070
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

    Fingerprint

    resource management
    natural resource
    land degradation
    old-growth forest
    soil conservation
    urban development
    local government
    forestry
    fishery
    wetland
    catchment
    biodiversity
    agriculture
    erosion
    water quality
    vegetation
    industry

    Cite this

    Millar, J. (2011). The Role of Extension in Natural Resource Management: the Australian experience. In Shaping Change: Natural Resource Management, Agriculture and the Role of Extension (2.3 ed., pp. 79-84). Australia: APEN.
    Millar, Joanne. / The Role of Extension in Natural Resource Management : the Australian experience. Shaping Change: Natural Resource Management, Agriculture and the Role of Extension. 2.3. ed. Australia : APEN, 2011. pp. 79-84
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    abstract = "This chapter expands on the role of extension in achieving sustainable management of Australia's natural resources. The first section describes how extension has evolved since the 1930s to address natural resource management (NRM) issues in Australia. Extension in natural resource management has moved from a single focus on soil and water conservation to tackle a wider range of environmental problems associated with agriculture, urban development, forestry and fisheries. This move has been driven by changing government and community priorities concerned with the erosion of public good assets (eg. vegetation, wildlife, biodiversity, water quality, wetlands, old growth forests etc). Extension for NRM also changed from individual property planning and on-ground works, to addressing problems at a catchment scale with coordinated action. Changes in extension priorities and approaches could be seen to have been reactive instead of proactive towards the unfolding crisis of land degradation. This may have been the case early on with the transition from production based extension to NRM extension. However, the second section in this chapter illustrates how NRM extension approaches and methods have become more integrated, participatory and knowledge intensive over time, in a bid to get ahead of land degradation problems.Fuelled by government funding and community support, regional NRM organisations have formed partnerships with private industry, local government and community groups to take on a greater role in extension. Hidden behind different programs, titles, funding arrangements, and job descriptions, NRM extension is varied but also has commonalities. These differences and similarities are highlighted using examples from across Australia.",
    keywords = "Agriculture, Extension, Landcare, Natural resource management",
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    Millar, J 2011, The Role of Extension in Natural Resource Management: the Australian experience. in Shaping Change: Natural Resource Management, Agriculture and the Role of Extension. 2.3 edn, APEN, Australia, pp. 79-84.

    The Role of Extension in Natural Resource Management : the Australian experience. / Millar, Joanne.

    Shaping Change: Natural Resource Management, Agriculture and the Role of Extension. 2.3. ed. Australia : APEN, 2011. p. 79-84.

    Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperChapter

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    T1 - The Role of Extension in Natural Resource Management

    T2 - the Australian experience

    AU - Millar, Joanne

    N1 - Imported on 12 May 2017 - DigiTool details were: publisher = Australia: APEN, 2011. editor/s (773b) = Jess Jenning, Roger Packham, Dedee Woodside; Issue no. (773s) = 2.3; Parent title (773t) = Shaping Change: Natural Resource Management, Agriculture and the Role of Extension.

    PY - 2011

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    N2 - This chapter expands on the role of extension in achieving sustainable management of Australia's natural resources. The first section describes how extension has evolved since the 1930s to address natural resource management (NRM) issues in Australia. Extension in natural resource management has moved from a single focus on soil and water conservation to tackle a wider range of environmental problems associated with agriculture, urban development, forestry and fisheries. This move has been driven by changing government and community priorities concerned with the erosion of public good assets (eg. vegetation, wildlife, biodiversity, water quality, wetlands, old growth forests etc). Extension for NRM also changed from individual property planning and on-ground works, to addressing problems at a catchment scale with coordinated action. Changes in extension priorities and approaches could be seen to have been reactive instead of proactive towards the unfolding crisis of land degradation. This may have been the case early on with the transition from production based extension to NRM extension. However, the second section in this chapter illustrates how NRM extension approaches and methods have become more integrated, participatory and knowledge intensive over time, in a bid to get ahead of land degradation problems.Fuelled by government funding and community support, regional NRM organisations have formed partnerships with private industry, local government and community groups to take on a greater role in extension. Hidden behind different programs, titles, funding arrangements, and job descriptions, NRM extension is varied but also has commonalities. These differences and similarities are highlighted using examples from across Australia.

    AB - This chapter expands on the role of extension in achieving sustainable management of Australia's natural resources. The first section describes how extension has evolved since the 1930s to address natural resource management (NRM) issues in Australia. Extension in natural resource management has moved from a single focus on soil and water conservation to tackle a wider range of environmental problems associated with agriculture, urban development, forestry and fisheries. This move has been driven by changing government and community priorities concerned with the erosion of public good assets (eg. vegetation, wildlife, biodiversity, water quality, wetlands, old growth forests etc). Extension for NRM also changed from individual property planning and on-ground works, to addressing problems at a catchment scale with coordinated action. Changes in extension priorities and approaches could be seen to have been reactive instead of proactive towards the unfolding crisis of land degradation. This may have been the case early on with the transition from production based extension to NRM extension. However, the second section in this chapter illustrates how NRM extension approaches and methods have become more integrated, participatory and knowledge intensive over time, in a bid to get ahead of land degradation problems.Fuelled by government funding and community support, regional NRM organisations have formed partnerships with private industry, local government and community groups to take on a greater role in extension. Hidden behind different programs, titles, funding arrangements, and job descriptions, NRM extension is varied but also has commonalities. These differences and similarities are highlighted using examples from across Australia.

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    BT - Shaping Change

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    Millar J. The Role of Extension in Natural Resource Management: the Australian experience. In Shaping Change: Natural Resource Management, Agriculture and the Role of Extension. 2.3 ed. Australia: APEN. 2011. p. 79-84