The Treasures of the Sea

The 2001 Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

Abstract

The looting and destruction of underwater cultural heritage (UCH) is leading to the irretrievable loss of our common heritage. Today, the recovery of artefacts from shipwrecks on the deep seabed has become a significant commercial maritime venture in international waters. Advances in marine science such as the invention of the aqua lung, submersible vessels, and more recently, remotely operated submersibles have resulted in humans searching for and accessing shipwrecks in the deepest parts of the world's oceans. Adopted in 2001 by the United Nations' Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation's (UNESCO) General Conference, and entered into force on January 2, 2009, the 2001 Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage (CPUCH) represents an international response to the concerns of looting and destruction of UCH. The 2001 CPUCH truncates the ancient Law of Salvage and bans the commercial trade in UCH. The archaeological community's view that artefacts recovered from historic wrecks should never be sold and should not form part of private collections is reinforced by the convention. The 2001 CPUCH also adheres to archaeologists' belief and other stakeholders concerned with the protection cultural materials that the application of Admiralty Law to historic wrecks is inappropriate. This paper looks at the historical practice of historic shipwreck salvage and examines the 2001 CPUCH approach towards protecting the ocean's underwater archaeological sites
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLaw and Public Policy
Place of PublicationSingapore
PublisherGlobal Science and Technology Forum
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Event4th Annual International Conference on Law, Regulations and Public Policy - Singapore, Singapore
Duration: 08 Jun 201509 Jun 2015

Conference

Conference4th Annual International Conference on Law, Regulations and Public Policy
CountrySingapore
Period08/06/1509/06/15

Fingerprint

cultural heritage
artifact
legal usage
UNESCO
ban
invention
stakeholder
water
Law
science
community

Cite this

Browne, K. (2015). The Treasures of the Sea: The 2001 Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage. In Law and Public Policy Singapore: Global Science and Technology Forum.
Browne, Kim. / The Treasures of the Sea : The 2001 Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage. Law and Public Policy. Singapore : Global Science and Technology Forum, 2015.
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abstract = "The looting and destruction of underwater cultural heritage (UCH) is leading to the irretrievable loss of our common heritage. Today, the recovery of artefacts from shipwrecks on the deep seabed has become a significant commercial maritime venture in international waters. Advances in marine science such as the invention of the aqua lung, submersible vessels, and more recently, remotely operated submersibles have resulted in humans searching for and accessing shipwrecks in the deepest parts of the world's oceans. Adopted in 2001 by the United Nations' Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation's (UNESCO) General Conference, and entered into force on January 2, 2009, the 2001 Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage (CPUCH) represents an international response to the concerns of looting and destruction of UCH. The 2001 CPUCH truncates the ancient Law of Salvage and bans the commercial trade in UCH. The archaeological community's view that artefacts recovered from historic wrecks should never be sold and should not form part of private collections is reinforced by the convention. The 2001 CPUCH also adheres to archaeologists' belief and other stakeholders concerned with the protection cultural materials that the application of Admiralty Law to historic wrecks is inappropriate. This paper looks at the historical practice of historic shipwreck salvage and examines the 2001 CPUCH approach towards protecting the ocean's underwater archaeological sites",
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Browne, K 2015, The Treasures of the Sea: The 2001 Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage. in Law and Public Policy. Global Science and Technology Forum, Singapore, 4th Annual International Conference on Law, Regulations and Public Policy, Singapore, 08/06/15.

The Treasures of the Sea : The 2001 Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage. / Browne, Kim.

Law and Public Policy. Singapore : Global Science and Technology Forum, 2015.

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

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Browne K. The Treasures of the Sea: The 2001 Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage. In Law and Public Policy. Singapore: Global Science and Technology Forum. 2015