Theory and practice: The contribution of off-the-job training to the development of apprentices and trainees

Erica Smith

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    13 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This article uses the findings from a qualitative study of Australian young people in their first year of full-time work to examine the nature and utility of off-the-job training in apprenticeships and traineeships. The findings confirm the conclusions of earlier studies about the importance of off-the-job training as a supplement for workplace learning. It was found that, while initially not attaching much value to off-the-job training, the young people gained more of an appreciation, during the course of the year, of what off-the-job training had to offer. Other findings about off-the-job training included: the superiority of face-to-face training as opposed to other forms of delivery; the importance of the young people's relationships with their off-the-job trainers; the 'implicit contract' of expectations of the parties to the training contract; the different viewpoints of the parties; and the dissatisfaction of those in traineeships with the lack of intellectual challenge in their competency-based curriculum.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)431-456
    Number of pages26
    JournalJournal of Vocational Education and Training
    Volume54
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2002

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