Thinking ethically about needle and syringe programs

John Kleinig

    Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperChapter

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Accepting-for the sake of argument-our current legal policies concerning heroin use and its users, what ethical questions are raised for needle and syringe program (NSPs)? Do they weaken drug laws, send the wrong message or obscure the right message, do little to eliminate the harm of drugs, detract from alternatives, and/or constitute a counsel of despair? I suggest that in the absence of established better alternatives, NSPs constitute a morally acceptable and in some cases even desirable option despite the continued criminalization of injecting drug use. Yet they must be conceived and administered in ways that do not reinforce prevailing social prejudices.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationEthical challenges for intervening in drug use
    Subtitle of host publicationPolicy, research and treatment issues
    EditorsJohn Kleinig, Stanley Einstein
    Place of PublicationHuntsville, USA
    PublisherOffice of International Criminal Justice Press
    Pages121-132
    Number of pages12
    Volume5
    ISBN (Print)0942511654, 9780942511673
    Publication statusPublished - 2006

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  • Cite this

    Kleinig, J. (2006). Thinking ethically about needle and syringe programs. In J. Kleinig, & S. Einstein (Eds.), Ethical challenges for intervening in drug use: Policy, research and treatment issues (Vol. 5, pp. 121-132). [6] Office of International Criminal Justice Press.