To buy or not to buy: The roles of self-identity, attitudes, perceived behavioral control and norms in organic consumerism

Miles H. Johe, Navjot Bhullar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

103 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current study examined the role psychological determinants (self-identity, attitudes, perceived behavioral control, and norms) play in organic consumerism. Participants (N = 252, meanage = 44.35, SD = 15.29, 97% resided in Australia) were randomly assigned to one of the three experimental conditions: (1) organic identity prime, (2) pro-environmental identity prime, and (3) neither pro-environmental nor organic identity primes (control). Analysis of variance revealed that organic identity prime was associated with significant increase in intentions to purchase organic products, relative to both pro-environmental identity and control conditions. Follow-up mediation analysis indicated that organic self-identity increased consumer intentions by influencing their attitudes and group norms. These results demonstrate that organic identity can be primed to create identity-congruent shifts toward organic consumerism. Importantly, these findings have direct application for marketing strategies aiming at promoting and developing an "organic" brand.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)99-105
Number of pages7
JournalEcological Economics
Volume128
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Aug 2016

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