Total grazing pressure: a defining concept for extensive pastoral systems in the southern rangelands of Australia

R. B. Hacker, Katrina Sinclair, C.M. Waters

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In Australia, particularly in the southern rangelands, large populations of native and feral herbivores (including kangaroos, goats, rabbits, pigs, donkeys and camels, depending on the location) co-exist with domestic livestock. In recent decades the concept of ‘total grazing pressure’ has been developed, and widely accepted, to denote the total forage demand of all vertebrate herbivores relative to the forage supply. This concept provides a framework within which both domestic and non-domestic species can be managed to allow commercially viable livestock production, landscape maintenance or restoration and species conservation. The concept should have relevance wherever pest animal control programs,biodiversity conservation,or commercialisation of wildlife are conducted in conjunction with extensive livestock production. The rationale for the compilation of the Special Issue is outlined.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)457-460
    Number of pages4
    JournalRangeland Journal
    Volume41
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 12 Feb 2020

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