Towards an Evidence-Informed Adventure Therapy

Implementing Feedback-Informed Treatment in the Field.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As an intervention for adolescents, adventure therapy has evolved considerably over the last three decades with support from multiple meta-analyses and research input from both residential and outpatient services. Tainted by a history of unethical practice and issues of accountability, this article explores the question of how adventure therapy can meet a standard of evidence preferred by policymakers and funding bodies on the international stage. In this case, feedback-informed treatment (FIT) is presented as a means for routine outcome management, creating a framework for adventure therapy which aims to improve the quality of participant engagement while maintaining and operationalizing today’s definitions for evidence-based practice. A case vignette illustrates the use of FIT with an adolescent participant engaged on a 14-day adventure therapy program.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)172-182
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Evidence-Informed Social Work
Volume14
Issue number3
Early online date07 Apr 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 May 2017

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evidence
adolescent
Therapeutics
Evidence-Based Practice
funding
Social Responsibility
Ambulatory Care
responsibility
Meta-Analysis
history
management
Research

Cite this

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title = "Towards an Evidence-Informed Adventure Therapy: Implementing Feedback-Informed Treatment in the Field.",
abstract = "As an intervention for adolescents, adventure therapy has evolved considerably over the last three decades with support from multiple meta-analyses and research input from both residential and outpatient services. Tainted by a history of unethical practice and issues of accountability, this article explores the question of how adventure therapy can meet a standard of evidence preferred by policymakers and funding bodies on the international stage. In this case, feedback-informed treatment (FIT) is presented as a means for routine outcome management, creating a framework for adventure therapy which aims to improve the quality of participant engagement while maintaining and operationalizing today’s definitions for evidence-based practice. A case vignette illustrates the use of FIT with an adolescent participant engaged on a 14-day adventure therapy program.",
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