Tracking double degree university students' transitions, career development and professional choices in a rural Bachelor of Nursing program

Noelene Hickey

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

58 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

However, results also indicated that one-third of final year double degree students planned to choose a career other than nursing. These students wanted a work style that they perceived nursing would not offer, such as a four-day working week and one-to-one teams. Findings from the graduate cohort showed that, once employed, most graduates remained in a nursing career. This was due to workplace experiences that fostered support and the advancement of their skills and knowledge.This research has implications for the higher education sector, Government policy, the nursing profession and employers. Stakeholders need to think carefully about the efficacy of double degree programs as a means of meeting pressing goals for sustainability of the nursing profession. If the loss of double degree nursing graduates to other professions is not stemmed, this will add further to the already depleted workforce and impact on the provision of nursing care in the Australian healthcare system.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • Charles Sturt University
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Harrison, Linda, Co-Supervisor
  • Sumsion, Jennifer, Co-Supervisor
Award date14 Nov 2013
Place of PublicationAustralia
Publisher
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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