Translation of the weight-related behaviours questionnaire into a short-form psychosocial assessment tool for the detection of women at risk of excessive gestational weight gain

Shanna Fealy, Lucy Leigh, Michael Hazelton, John Attia, Maralyn Foureur, Christopher Oldmeadow, Clare E. Collins, Roger Smith, Alexis J. Hure

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The identification and measurement of psychosocial factors that are specific to pregnancy and relevant to gestational weight gain is a challenging task. Given the general lack of availability of pregnancy-specific psychosocial assessment instruments, the aim of this study was to develop a short-form psychosocial assessment tool for the detection of women at risk of excessive gestational weight gain with research and clinical practice applications. A staged scale reduction analysis of the weight-related behaviours questionnaire was conducted amongst a sample of 159 Australian pregnant women participating in the Women and Their Children’s Health (WATCH) pregnancy cohort study. Exploratory factor analysis, univariate logistic regression, and item response theory techniques were used to derive the minimum and most predictive questions for inclusion in the short-form assessment tool. Of the total 49 questionnaire items, 11 items, all 4 body image items, n = 4 attitudes towards weight gain, and n = 3 self-efficacy items, were retained as the strongest predictors of excessive gestational weight gain. These within-scale items were highly correlated, exhibiting high item information function value statistics, and were observed to have high probability (p < 0.05) for excessive gestational weight gain, in the univariate analysis. The short-form questionnaire may assist with the development of tailored health promotion interventions to support women psychologically and physiologically to optimise their pregnancy weight gain. Confirmatory factor analysis is now required.
Original languageEnglish
Article number9522
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume18
Issue number18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2021

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