Transnational vehicle crime: the use of intelligence triangulation to estimate stolen vehicle export volumes

Lisa Jane Young

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Transnational vehicle crime (TVC) is already established in Australia. Involvement in the global re-distribution of stolen vehicles offers high financial returns at negligible risk, and local intelligence suggests that numerous variations on the general theme have existed for over a decade. However, the best sources of data, information and intelligence used to estimate stolen vehicle export are inherently flawed: border detections are infrequent, the disposal method of unrecovered vehicles is often indeterminate, and learnings from other nations are only partially applicable in the local context. The resulting uncertainty creates an immediate difficulty in prioritising TVC against competing concerns.This article aims to demonstrate a practical approach to the triangulation of operational (qualitative) intelligence with a structured analysis of (quantitative) vehicle theft records to generate a reliable estimation of stolen vehicle exportation from Australia.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)46-69
    Number of pages24
    JournalJournal of the Australian Institute of Professional Intelligence Officers
    Volume14
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - 2007

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    triangulation
    intelligence
    offense
    larceny
    redistribution
    uncertainty
    learning

    Cite this

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    title = "Transnational vehicle crime: the use of intelligence triangulation to estimate stolen vehicle export volumes",
    abstract = "Transnational vehicle crime (TVC) is already established in Australia. Involvement in the global re-distribution of stolen vehicles offers high financial returns at negligible risk, and local intelligence suggests that numerous variations on the general theme have existed for over a decade. However, the best sources of data, information and intelligence used to estimate stolen vehicle export are inherently flawed: border detections are infrequent, the disposal method of unrecovered vehicles is often indeterminate, and learnings from other nations are only partially applicable in the local context. The resulting uncertainty creates an immediate difficulty in prioritising TVC against competing concerns.This article aims to demonstrate a practical approach to the triangulation of operational (qualitative) intelligence with a structured analysis of (quantitative) vehicle theft records to generate a reliable estimation of stolen vehicle exportation from Australia.",
    keywords = "Auto intelligence export, Stolen vehicles, Transnational organised crime, Triangulation",
    author = "Young, {Lisa Jane}",
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    AU - Young, Lisa Jane

    N1 - Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = Journal of the Australian Institute of Professional Intelligence Officers. ISSNs: 1039-1525;

    PY - 2007

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    N2 - Transnational vehicle crime (TVC) is already established in Australia. Involvement in the global re-distribution of stolen vehicles offers high financial returns at negligible risk, and local intelligence suggests that numerous variations on the general theme have existed for over a decade. However, the best sources of data, information and intelligence used to estimate stolen vehicle export are inherently flawed: border detections are infrequent, the disposal method of unrecovered vehicles is often indeterminate, and learnings from other nations are only partially applicable in the local context. The resulting uncertainty creates an immediate difficulty in prioritising TVC against competing concerns.This article aims to demonstrate a practical approach to the triangulation of operational (qualitative) intelligence with a structured analysis of (quantitative) vehicle theft records to generate a reliable estimation of stolen vehicle exportation from Australia.

    AB - Transnational vehicle crime (TVC) is already established in Australia. Involvement in the global re-distribution of stolen vehicles offers high financial returns at negligible risk, and local intelligence suggests that numerous variations on the general theme have existed for over a decade. However, the best sources of data, information and intelligence used to estimate stolen vehicle export are inherently flawed: border detections are infrequent, the disposal method of unrecovered vehicles is often indeterminate, and learnings from other nations are only partially applicable in the local context. The resulting uncertainty creates an immediate difficulty in prioritising TVC against competing concerns.This article aims to demonstrate a practical approach to the triangulation of operational (qualitative) intelligence with a structured analysis of (quantitative) vehicle theft records to generate a reliable estimation of stolen vehicle exportation from Australia.

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    KW - Stolen vehicles

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    KW - Triangulation

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