Transpiration efficiency of the grapevine cv. Semillon is tied to VPD in warm climates

Suzy Rogiers, Dennis Greer, Ronald Hutton, Simon Clarke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Water-use efficiency in grapevines is dependent on the aerial and below-ground environment of the plant. Specifically, transpiration efficiency, the ratio of net carbon fixation to water loss, may be influenced by soil moisture and the leaf-to-air vapour pressure deficit (VPD) in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. The interactive effect of these abiotic parameters, however, has not been suitably investigated in field-grown grapevines. Accordingly, gas exchange of an anisohydric variety, Semillon, was assessed across a number of vineyards in two warm grape growing regions of NSW to ascertain how soil moisture and VPD interact to affect transpiration efficiency at the leaf level. Leaf gas exchange measurements demonstrated that the rate of transpiration (E) was driven by VPD, particularly under high soil moisture. Both high VPD and low soil moisture decreased photosynthesis (A) and instantaneous leaf transpiration efficiency (A/E). Increased intrinsic leaf transpiration efficiency (A/g) in response to drying soil was limited to vines growing in a non-irrigated vineyard. In this site A/g was negatively related to vine water status. VPD did not have a substantial influence on A/g in any vineyard. While VPD is the main driver for A/E, soil moisture is an important determinant of A/g. Under high VPD, stomatal closure in Semillon leaves was not substantial enough to suitably curtail transpiration, and as a consequence A/E declined. These data indicate that in warm climates, irrigation scheduling of anisohydric varieties must take into account both VPD and soil moisture so that vine water status can be maintained.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)106-114
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of Applied Biology
Volume158
Issue number1
Early online date2010
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2011

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vapor pressure
transpiration
climate
soil water
vineyards
vines
leaves
gas exchange
soil-plant-atmosphere interactions
Calvin cycle
water
viticulture
irrigation scheduling
water use efficiency
drying
photosynthesis
air
soil

Cite this

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title = "Transpiration efficiency of the grapevine cv. Semillon is tied to VPD in warm climates",
abstract = "Water-use efficiency in grapevines is dependent on the aerial and below-ground environment of the plant. Specifically, transpiration efficiency, the ratio of net carbon fixation to water loss, may be influenced by soil moisture and the leaf-to-air vapour pressure deficit (VPD) in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. The interactive effect of these abiotic parameters, however, has not been suitably investigated in field-grown grapevines. Accordingly, gas exchange of an anisohydric variety, Semillon, was assessed across a number of vineyards in two warm grape growing regions of NSW to ascertain how soil moisture and VPD interact to affect transpiration efficiency at the leaf level. Leaf gas exchange measurements demonstrated that the rate of transpiration (E) was driven by VPD, particularly under high soil moisture. Both high VPD and low soil moisture decreased photosynthesis (A) and instantaneous leaf transpiration efficiency (A/E). Increased intrinsic leaf transpiration efficiency (A/g) in response to drying soil was limited to vines growing in a non-irrigated vineyard. In this site A/g was negatively related to vine water status. VPD did not have a substantial influence on A/g in any vineyard. While VPD is the main driver for A/E, soil moisture is an important determinant of A/g. Under high VPD, stomatal closure in Semillon leaves was not substantial enough to suitably curtail transpiration, and as a consequence A/E declined. These data indicate that in warm climates, irrigation scheduling of anisohydric varieties must take into account both VPD and soil moisture so that vine water status can be maintained.",
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Transpiration efficiency of the grapevine cv. Semillon is tied to VPD in warm climates. / Rogiers, Suzy; Greer, Dennis; Hutton, Ronald; Clarke, Simon.

In: Annals of Applied Biology, Vol. 158, No. 1, 01.2011, p. 106-114.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Transpiration efficiency of the grapevine cv. Semillon is tied to VPD in warm climates

AU - Rogiers, Suzy

AU - Greer, Dennis

AU - Hutton, Ronald

AU - Clarke, Simon

N1 - Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: month (773h) = January 2011; Journal title (773t) = Annals of Applied Biology. ISSNs: 0003-4746;

PY - 2011/1

Y1 - 2011/1

N2 - Water-use efficiency in grapevines is dependent on the aerial and below-ground environment of the plant. Specifically, transpiration efficiency, the ratio of net carbon fixation to water loss, may be influenced by soil moisture and the leaf-to-air vapour pressure deficit (VPD) in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. The interactive effect of these abiotic parameters, however, has not been suitably investigated in field-grown grapevines. Accordingly, gas exchange of an anisohydric variety, Semillon, was assessed across a number of vineyards in two warm grape growing regions of NSW to ascertain how soil moisture and VPD interact to affect transpiration efficiency at the leaf level. Leaf gas exchange measurements demonstrated that the rate of transpiration (E) was driven by VPD, particularly under high soil moisture. Both high VPD and low soil moisture decreased photosynthesis (A) and instantaneous leaf transpiration efficiency (A/E). Increased intrinsic leaf transpiration efficiency (A/g) in response to drying soil was limited to vines growing in a non-irrigated vineyard. In this site A/g was negatively related to vine water status. VPD did not have a substantial influence on A/g in any vineyard. While VPD is the main driver for A/E, soil moisture is an important determinant of A/g. Under high VPD, stomatal closure in Semillon leaves was not substantial enough to suitably curtail transpiration, and as a consequence A/E declined. These data indicate that in warm climates, irrigation scheduling of anisohydric varieties must take into account both VPD and soil moisture so that vine water status can be maintained.

AB - Water-use efficiency in grapevines is dependent on the aerial and below-ground environment of the plant. Specifically, transpiration efficiency, the ratio of net carbon fixation to water loss, may be influenced by soil moisture and the leaf-to-air vapour pressure deficit (VPD) in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. The interactive effect of these abiotic parameters, however, has not been suitably investigated in field-grown grapevines. Accordingly, gas exchange of an anisohydric variety, Semillon, was assessed across a number of vineyards in two warm grape growing regions of NSW to ascertain how soil moisture and VPD interact to affect transpiration efficiency at the leaf level. Leaf gas exchange measurements demonstrated that the rate of transpiration (E) was driven by VPD, particularly under high soil moisture. Both high VPD and low soil moisture decreased photosynthesis (A) and instantaneous leaf transpiration efficiency (A/E). Increased intrinsic leaf transpiration efficiency (A/g) in response to drying soil was limited to vines growing in a non-irrigated vineyard. In this site A/g was negatively related to vine water status. VPD did not have a substantial influence on A/g in any vineyard. While VPD is the main driver for A/E, soil moisture is an important determinant of A/g. Under high VPD, stomatal closure in Semillon leaves was not substantial enough to suitably curtail transpiration, and as a consequence A/E declined. These data indicate that in warm climates, irrigation scheduling of anisohydric varieties must take into account both VPD and soil moisture so that vine water status can be maintained.

KW - Open access version available

KW - Anisohydric

KW - Drought responses

KW - Evaporative demand

KW - Semillon

KW - Stomatal regulation

KW - Water relations

U2 - 10.1111/j.1744-7348.2010.00446.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1744-7348.2010.00446.x

M3 - Article

VL - 158

SP - 106

EP - 114

JO - Annals of Applied Biology

JF - Annals of Applied Biology

SN - 0003-4746

IS - 1

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