Trial of interpersonal counselling after major physical trauma

Alex Holmes, Gene Hodgins, Sarah Adey, Shelly Menzel, Peter Danne, Thomas Kossmann, Fiona Judd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the present study was to determine if interpersonal counselling (IPC) was effective in reducing psychological morbidity after major physical trauma. METHODS: One hundred and seventeen subjects were recruited from two major trauma centres and randomized to treatment as usual or IPC in the first 3 months following trauma. Measures of depressive, anxiety and post-traumatic symptoms were taken at baseline, 3 months and 6 months. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM IV diagnoses was conducted at baseline and at 6 months to assess for psychiatric disorder. RESULTS: Fifty-eight patients completed the study. Only half the patients randomized to IPC completed the therapy. At 6 months the level of depressive, anxiety and post-traumatic symptoms and the prevalence of psychiatric disorder did not differ significantly between the intervention and treatment-as-usual groups. Subjects with a past history of major depression who received IPC had significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms at 6 months. CONCLUSION: IPC was not effective as a universal intervention to reduce psychiatric morbidity after major physical trauma and may increase morbidity in vulnerable individuals. Patient dropout is likely to be a major problem in universal multi-session preventative interventions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)926-933
Number of pages8
JournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Volume41
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2007

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Counseling
Wounds and Injuries
Psychiatry
Morbidity
Anxiety
Depression
Patient Dropouts
Trauma Centers
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Therapeutics
Interviews
Psychology

Cite this

Holmes, Alex ; Hodgins, Gene ; Adey, Sarah ; Menzel, Shelly ; Danne, Peter ; Kossmann, Thomas ; Judd, Fiona. / Trial of interpersonal counselling after major physical trauma. In: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry. 2007 ; Vol. 41, No. 11. pp. 926-933.
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Trial of interpersonal counselling after major physical trauma. / Holmes, Alex; Hodgins, Gene; Adey, Sarah; Menzel, Shelly; Danne, Peter; Kossmann, Thomas; Judd, Fiona.

In: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 41, No. 11, 11.2007, p. 926-933.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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