Trichome characteristics of F1 Lycopersicon esculentum x L. cheesmanii f. minor and L. esculentum x L. penellii hybrids and effects on Myzus persicae

Aaron Simmons, Des McGrath, Geoffrey Gurr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) is a serious pest of the tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). Trichome-based host plant resistance of wild Lycopersicon species may offer an alternative to pesticides for management of this pest. Two wild species, Lycopersicon cheesmanii f. minor and L. pennellii, were crossed with L. esculentum and the types and densities of trichomes possessed by the F1 hybrids measured. The effects of these trichomes on M. persicae were assessed by placing nymphs on leaves and, 96 hr later, designating each nymph as either dead, alive, emigrating off the leaf or unaccounted for. A generalised linear model was used to detect relationships between the numbers of nymphs in each designation and the densities of trichomes and leaf area. Mortality of nymphs on L. pennellii hybrids was associated with high densities of type IV and low densities of type I trichomes. Mortality of nymphs on L. cheesmanii f. minor hybrids was associated with high densities of type III trichomes. An increase in the densities of type III trichomes on L. pennellii hybrids was associated with greater numbers of nymphs emigrating off the leaf whilst unaccounted nymphs on L. pennellii hybrids were associated with increased densities of type VII and type I trichomes. Further experimentation using excised leaflets found mortality on L. pennellii hybrids may be due to nymphs being hindered by type I trichomes and increased densities of type V trichomes were associated with greater numbers of unhindered nymphs. Implications of results are discussed in the context of introducing trichome-based host plant resistance into L. esculentum.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)313-320
Number of pages8
JournalEuphytica
Volume144
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Solanum cheesmaniae
Trichomes
Aphids
Myzus persicae
Lycopersicon esculentum
Nymph
Solanum lycopersicum var. lycopersicum
trichomes
nymphs
Mortality
host plants
Solanum pennellii var. pennellii
leaves
Pest Control
Solanum
pest management
Pesticides

Cite this

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title = "Trichome characteristics of F1 Lycopersicon esculentum x L. cheesmanii f. minor and L. esculentum x L. penellii hybrids and effects on Myzus persicae",
abstract = "The green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) is a serious pest of the tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). Trichome-based host plant resistance of wild Lycopersicon species may offer an alternative to pesticides for management of this pest. Two wild species, Lycopersicon cheesmanii f. minor and L. pennellii, were crossed with L. esculentum and the types and densities of trichomes possessed by the F1 hybrids measured. The effects of these trichomes on M. persicae were assessed by placing nymphs on leaves and, 96 hr later, designating each nymph as either dead, alive, emigrating off the leaf or unaccounted for. A generalised linear model was used to detect relationships between the numbers of nymphs in each designation and the densities of trichomes and leaf area. Mortality of nymphs on L. pennellii hybrids was associated with high densities of type IV and low densities of type I trichomes. Mortality of nymphs on L. cheesmanii f. minor hybrids was associated with high densities of type III trichomes. An increase in the densities of type III trichomes on L. pennellii hybrids was associated with greater numbers of nymphs emigrating off the leaf whilst unaccounted nymphs on L. pennellii hybrids were associated with increased densities of type VII and type I trichomes. Further experimentation using excised leaflets found mortality on L. pennellii hybrids may be due to nymphs being hindered by type I trichomes and increased densities of type V trichomes were associated with greater numbers of unhindered nymphs. Implications of results are discussed in the context of introducing trichome-based host plant resistance into L. esculentum.",
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Trichome characteristics of F1 Lycopersicon esculentum x L. cheesmanii f. minor and L. esculentum x L. penellii hybrids and effects on Myzus persicae. / Simmons, Aaron; McGrath, Des; Gurr, Geoffrey.

In: Euphytica, Vol. 144, No. 3, 2005, p. 313-320.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Trichome characteristics of F1 Lycopersicon esculentum x L. cheesmanii f. minor and L. esculentum x L. penellii hybrids and effects on Myzus persicae

AU - Simmons, Aaron

AU - McGrath, Des

AU - Gurr, Geoffrey

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PY - 2005

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N2 - The green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) is a serious pest of the tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). Trichome-based host plant resistance of wild Lycopersicon species may offer an alternative to pesticides for management of this pest. Two wild species, Lycopersicon cheesmanii f. minor and L. pennellii, were crossed with L. esculentum and the types and densities of trichomes possessed by the F1 hybrids measured. The effects of these trichomes on M. persicae were assessed by placing nymphs on leaves and, 96 hr later, designating each nymph as either dead, alive, emigrating off the leaf or unaccounted for. A generalised linear model was used to detect relationships between the numbers of nymphs in each designation and the densities of trichomes and leaf area. Mortality of nymphs on L. pennellii hybrids was associated with high densities of type IV and low densities of type I trichomes. Mortality of nymphs on L. cheesmanii f. minor hybrids was associated with high densities of type III trichomes. An increase in the densities of type III trichomes on L. pennellii hybrids was associated with greater numbers of nymphs emigrating off the leaf whilst unaccounted nymphs on L. pennellii hybrids were associated with increased densities of type VII and type I trichomes. Further experimentation using excised leaflets found mortality on L. pennellii hybrids may be due to nymphs being hindered by type I trichomes and increased densities of type V trichomes were associated with greater numbers of unhindered nymphs. Implications of results are discussed in the context of introducing trichome-based host plant resistance into L. esculentum.

AB - The green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) is a serious pest of the tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). Trichome-based host plant resistance of wild Lycopersicon species may offer an alternative to pesticides for management of this pest. Two wild species, Lycopersicon cheesmanii f. minor and L. pennellii, were crossed with L. esculentum and the types and densities of trichomes possessed by the F1 hybrids measured. The effects of these trichomes on M. persicae were assessed by placing nymphs on leaves and, 96 hr later, designating each nymph as either dead, alive, emigrating off the leaf or unaccounted for. A generalised linear model was used to detect relationships between the numbers of nymphs in each designation and the densities of trichomes and leaf area. Mortality of nymphs on L. pennellii hybrids was associated with high densities of type IV and low densities of type I trichomes. Mortality of nymphs on L. cheesmanii f. minor hybrids was associated with high densities of type III trichomes. An increase in the densities of type III trichomes on L. pennellii hybrids was associated with greater numbers of nymphs emigrating off the leaf whilst unaccounted nymphs on L. pennellii hybrids were associated with increased densities of type VII and type I trichomes. Further experimentation using excised leaflets found mortality on L. pennellii hybrids may be due to nymphs being hindered by type I trichomes and increased densities of type V trichomes were associated with greater numbers of unhindered nymphs. Implications of results are discussed in the context of introducing trichome-based host plant resistance into L. esculentum.

U2 - 10.1007/s10681-005-8002-x

DO - 10.1007/s10681-005-8002-x

M3 - Article

VL - 144

SP - 313

EP - 320

JO - Euphytica

JF - Euphytica

SN - 0014-2336

IS - 3

ER -