Typically developing and speech-impaired children's adherence to the sonority hypothesis

Lynelle Wyllie-Smith, Sharynne McLeod, Martin J Ball

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During phonological development, children frequently produce consonant clusters as consonant singletons, a process commonly referred to as cluster reduction. The principles of sonority may provide a theoretical basis for explaining patterns of cluster reduction evident in children's speech. Two studies were conducted to investigate whether children's word-initial cluster reductions adhered to the sonority hypothesis. Study one involved 16 children with typically developing speech, and study two involved 40 children with impaired speech. The children's consonant cluster productions characterized by a cluster reduction were analysed. When both groups of participants reduced wordinitial clusters to a target consonant, the sonority hypothesis was adhered to; but when the clusters were reduced to a non-target consonant, the sonority hypothesis was violated. Analysis of target and non-target reductions revealed that some reductions of the individual clusters, and those within specific cluster categories, adhered to the sonority hypothesis while others did not. In light of these findings, it is suggested that although sonority is a valuable concept, it may not account for all patterns of cluster reduction evident in children's speech.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)271-291
Number of pages21
JournalClinical Linguistics and Phonetics
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Fingerprint

Sonority
Adherence
Cluster Reduction
Consonant
Group
Consonant Clusters
Phonological Development

Cite this

@article{8d3cfa250b7e49d28832561fe6352f7c,
title = "Typically developing and speech-impaired children's adherence to the sonority hypothesis",
abstract = "During phonological development, children frequently produce consonant clusters as consonant singletons, a process commonly referred to as cluster reduction. The principles of sonority may provide a theoretical basis for explaining patterns of cluster reduction evident in children's speech. Two studies were conducted to investigate whether children's word-initial cluster reductions adhered to the sonority hypothesis. Study one involved 16 children with typically developing speech, and study two involved 40 children with impaired speech. The children's consonant cluster productions characterized by a cluster reduction were analysed. When both groups of participants reduced wordinitial clusters to a target consonant, the sonority hypothesis was adhered to; but when the clusters were reduced to a non-target consonant, the sonority hypothesis was violated. Analysis of target and non-target reductions revealed that some reductions of the individual clusters, and those within specific cluster categories, adhered to the sonority hypothesis while others did not. In light of these findings, it is suggested that although sonority is a valuable concept, it may not account for all patterns of cluster reduction evident in children's speech.",
author = "Lynelle Wyllie-Smith and Sharynne McLeod and Ball, {Martin J}",
note = "Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics. ISSNs: 0269-9206;",
year = "2006",
doi = "10.1080/02699200400016497",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "271--291",
journal = "Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics",
issn = "0269-9206",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare USA",
number = "4",

}

Typically developing and speech-impaired children's adherence to the sonority hypothesis. / Wyllie-Smith, Lynelle; McLeod, Sharynne; Ball, Martin J.

In: Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics, Vol. 20, No. 4, 2006, p. 271-291.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Typically developing and speech-impaired children's adherence to the sonority hypothesis

AU - Wyllie-Smith, Lynelle

AU - McLeod, Sharynne

AU - Ball, Martin J

N1 - Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics. ISSNs: 0269-9206;

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - During phonological development, children frequently produce consonant clusters as consonant singletons, a process commonly referred to as cluster reduction. The principles of sonority may provide a theoretical basis for explaining patterns of cluster reduction evident in children's speech. Two studies were conducted to investigate whether children's word-initial cluster reductions adhered to the sonority hypothesis. Study one involved 16 children with typically developing speech, and study two involved 40 children with impaired speech. The children's consonant cluster productions characterized by a cluster reduction were analysed. When both groups of participants reduced wordinitial clusters to a target consonant, the sonority hypothesis was adhered to; but when the clusters were reduced to a non-target consonant, the sonority hypothesis was violated. Analysis of target and non-target reductions revealed that some reductions of the individual clusters, and those within specific cluster categories, adhered to the sonority hypothesis while others did not. In light of these findings, it is suggested that although sonority is a valuable concept, it may not account for all patterns of cluster reduction evident in children's speech.

AB - During phonological development, children frequently produce consonant clusters as consonant singletons, a process commonly referred to as cluster reduction. The principles of sonority may provide a theoretical basis for explaining patterns of cluster reduction evident in children's speech. Two studies were conducted to investigate whether children's word-initial cluster reductions adhered to the sonority hypothesis. Study one involved 16 children with typically developing speech, and study two involved 40 children with impaired speech. The children's consonant cluster productions characterized by a cluster reduction were analysed. When both groups of participants reduced wordinitial clusters to a target consonant, the sonority hypothesis was adhered to; but when the clusters were reduced to a non-target consonant, the sonority hypothesis was violated. Analysis of target and non-target reductions revealed that some reductions of the individual clusters, and those within specific cluster categories, adhered to the sonority hypothesis while others did not. In light of these findings, it is suggested that although sonority is a valuable concept, it may not account for all patterns of cluster reduction evident in children's speech.

U2 - 10.1080/02699200400016497

DO - 10.1080/02699200400016497

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 271

EP - 291

JO - Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics

JF - Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics

SN - 0269-9206

IS - 4

ER -