Understanding consumer adoption of Internet banking: an interpretive study in the Australian banking context

Sharman Lichtenstein, Christina Williamson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper reports key findings from an interpretive study of Australian banking consumer experiences with the adoption of internet banking. The paper provides an understanding of how and why specific factors affect the consumer decision whether or not to bank on the internet, in the Australian context. A theoretical framework is provided that conceptualizes and links consumer-oriented issues influencing adoption of internet banking. The paper also provides a set of recommendations for Australian banks. Specifically, the findings suggest that convenience is the main motivator for consumers to bank on the internet, while there is a range of other influential factors that may be modulated by banks. The findings also highlight increasing risk acceptance by consumers in regard to internet-based services and the growing importance of offering deep levels of consumer support for such services. Gender differences are also highlighted. Finally, the paper suggests that banks will be better able to manage consumer experiences with moving to internet banking if they understand that such experiences involve a process of adjustment and learning over time, and not merely the adoption of a new technology.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)50-66
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Electronic Commerce Research
Volume7
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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