Unfogging the future: Investigating a strengths-based program to build capacity and resilience in parents with mental illness

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This paper presents a case study of a strength-based and recovery-focused parenting program designed for parents with a mental illness.

Method: The face-face program was delivered at a regional health organisation in Victoria, Australia and consisted of interactive and reflective weekly modules. Data were gathered using an interpretivist case study design, using a small sample of 4 parents and 2 program facilitators. Participating parents completed weekly reflective activities and program facilitators were interviewed about the implementation of the program.

Results: Findings indicated that parents particularly valued the opportunity to meet with other parents with a mental illness and found aspects of the program covering communication strategies, reducing stress and setting routines most useful. Strengths identified by facilitators included increased group cohesion and flexibility in the program which could be adapted to the group's needs.

Discussion: While recruitment to the program was difficult, this was possibly due to stigma around mental illness. However, although participant numbers were low, a small group size allowed for a personalised and tailored implementation of the program, meeting the particular needs of each parent.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)21-32
Number of pages12
JournalAdvances in Mental Health
Volume17
Issue number1
Early online date18 May 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 02 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Victoria
Communication
Health

Cite this

@article{649ee8df3ec848b4b7af61be031ad1f6,
title = "Unfogging the future: Investigating a strengths-based program to build capacity and resilience in parents with mental illness",
abstract = "Objective: This paper presents a case study of a strength-based and recovery-focused parenting program designed for parents with a mental illness.Method: The face-face program was delivered at a regional health organisation in Victoria, Australia and consisted of interactive and reflective weekly modules. Data were gathered using an interpretivist case study design, using a small sample of 4 parents and 2 program facilitators. Participating parents completed weekly reflective activities and program facilitators were interviewed about the implementation of the program.Results: Findings indicated that parents particularly valued the opportunity to meet with other parents with a mental illness and found aspects of the program covering communication strategies, reducing stress and setting routines most useful. Strengths identified by facilitators included increased group cohesion and flexibility in the program which could be adapted to the group's needs.Discussion: While recruitment to the program was difficult, this was possibly due to stigma around mental illness. However, although participant numbers were low, a small group size allowed for a personalised and tailored implementation of the program, meeting the particular needs of each parent.",
keywords = "Mental health, evidence-based practice, family support, parenting",
author = "Laura McFarland and Angela Fenton",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1080/18387357.2018.1476065",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "21--32",
journal = "Advances in Mental Health",
issn = "1446-7984",
publisher = "eContent Management Pty Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Unfogging the future

T2 - Investigating a strengths-based program to build capacity and resilience in parents with mental illness

AU - McFarland, Laura

AU - Fenton, Angela

PY - 2019/1/2

Y1 - 2019/1/2

N2 - Objective: This paper presents a case study of a strength-based and recovery-focused parenting program designed for parents with a mental illness.Method: The face-face program was delivered at a regional health organisation in Victoria, Australia and consisted of interactive and reflective weekly modules. Data were gathered using an interpretivist case study design, using a small sample of 4 parents and 2 program facilitators. Participating parents completed weekly reflective activities and program facilitators were interviewed about the implementation of the program.Results: Findings indicated that parents particularly valued the opportunity to meet with other parents with a mental illness and found aspects of the program covering communication strategies, reducing stress and setting routines most useful. Strengths identified by facilitators included increased group cohesion and flexibility in the program which could be adapted to the group's needs.Discussion: While recruitment to the program was difficult, this was possibly due to stigma around mental illness. However, although participant numbers were low, a small group size allowed for a personalised and tailored implementation of the program, meeting the particular needs of each parent.

AB - Objective: This paper presents a case study of a strength-based and recovery-focused parenting program designed for parents with a mental illness.Method: The face-face program was delivered at a regional health organisation in Victoria, Australia and consisted of interactive and reflective weekly modules. Data were gathered using an interpretivist case study design, using a small sample of 4 parents and 2 program facilitators. Participating parents completed weekly reflective activities and program facilitators were interviewed about the implementation of the program.Results: Findings indicated that parents particularly valued the opportunity to meet with other parents with a mental illness and found aspects of the program covering communication strategies, reducing stress and setting routines most useful. Strengths identified by facilitators included increased group cohesion and flexibility in the program which could be adapted to the group's needs.Discussion: While recruitment to the program was difficult, this was possibly due to stigma around mental illness. However, although participant numbers were low, a small group size allowed for a personalised and tailored implementation of the program, meeting the particular needs of each parent.

KW - Mental health

KW - evidence-based practice

KW - family support

KW - parenting

U2 - 10.1080/18387357.2018.1476065

DO - 10.1080/18387357.2018.1476065

M3 - Article

VL - 17

SP - 21

EP - 32

JO - Advances in Mental Health

JF - Advances in Mental Health

SN - 1446-7984

IS - 1

ER -