Use of stakeholder analysis to inform risk communication and extension strategies for improved biosecurity amongst small-scale pig producers

M. Hernández-Jover, J. Gilmour, N. Schembri, T. Sysak, P. K. Holyoake, R. Beilin, J. A L M L Toribio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Extension and communication needs amongst small-scale pig producers, described as pig producers with less than 100 sows, have been previously identified. These producers, who are believed to pose a biosecurity risk to commercial livestock industries, are characterized by a lack of formal networks, mistrust of authorities, poor disease reporting behaviour and motivational diversity, and reliance on other producers, veterinarians and family for pig health and production advice. This paper applies stakeholder identification and analysis tools to determine stakeholders' influence and interest on pig producers' practices. Findings can inform a risk communication process and the development of an extension framework to increase producers' engagement with industry and their compliance with biosecurity standards and legislation in Australia. The process included identification of stakeholders, their issues of concerns regarding small-scale pig producers and biosecurity and their influence and interest in each of these issues. This exercise identified the capacity of different stakeholders to influence the outcomes for each issue and assessed their success or failure to do so. The disconnection identified between the level of interest and influence suggests that government and industry need to work with the small-scale pig producers and with those who have the capacity to influence them. Successful biosecurity risk management will depend on shared responsibility and building trust amongst stakeholders. Flow-on effects may include legitimating the importance of reporting and compliance systems and the co-management of risk. Compliance of small-scale pig producers with biosecurity industry standards and legislation will reduce the risks of entry and spread of exotic diseases in Australia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)258-270
Number of pages13
JournalPreventive Veterinary Medicine
Volume104
Issue number3-4
Early online dateJan 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 May 2012

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