Using critical ethnography to explore culturally safe practice by the interdisciplinary team in residential aged care – candidate and supervisor perspectives

Research output: Other contribution to conferencePresentation only

Abstract

Critical ethnography is concerned with the change or transformation of individuals or organisations by examining a groups’ culture through the lens of power, prestige, privilege, and authority. In this PhD study, a critical ethnographic approach will be used to explore how culturally safe care is embodied in the practice of the interdisciplinary team at a residential aged care facility located in a regional town in NSW. This presentation reports on the initial phases of the study, specifically a scoping review and a small pilot study undertaken prior to commencing data collection. A scoping review was undertaken to obtain conceptual clarification about how cultural safety and racism are understood by interdisciplinary health professionals globally in the aged care sector in regional, rural, and remote areas. The purpose of the pilot study was to hone the candidates’ skills in observation, critical reflection and positioning, and the documentation of field notes, which are integral to the critical ethnographic approach. This presentation will provide an overview of researcher standpoint theory applied for professional reflexive practice.
Method: The scoping review was undertaken using the JBI protocol for scoping reviews. Ten papers in total were included in the review from Australia, Canada, the United States, Norway, and England.
Following the scoping review, a pilot study required the candidate to venture into spaces such as cafés to observe and document her surroundings. The subsequent fieldwork notes were reviewed by the candidate and supervision team. Strengths and areas for improvement in the fieldwork notes were discussed and applied to subsequent fieldwork excursions.
Conclusion: The scoping review showed there is limited evidence about health professionals’ understanding of cultural safety and how they provide culturally safe care in the aged care sector in regional, rural, and remote areas. Secondly, the review does not clearly illuminate what health professionals understand to be racist thinking or behaviour and how it is responded to in practice in aged care contexts.
The pilot study improved the quality of the candidate’s fieldnotes, particularly the use of precise, objective language to describe people and places. Key to this improvement was a reflexive approach grounded in standpoint theory. This presentation will be of interest to both practitioners and researchers as it discusses current gaps in the literature on culturally safe practice and the value of preparing for data collection in studies that require observational field work.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 12 Sept 2023
EventWestern NSW Health Research Network WHRN2023 Research Symposium: Advancing the quality of rural health research through networking: reflecting on our past, empowering our future. - Dubbo Regional Theatre and Conventions Centre, Darling Street, Dubbo, Australia
Duration: 11 Sept 202312 Sept 2023
https://whrnnetwork.wordpress.com/
https://whrnnetwork.wordpress.com/whrn2023-research-symposium-programme/ (Program)

Conference

ConferenceWestern NSW Health Research Network WHRN2023 Research Symposium
Country/TerritoryAustralia
CityDubbo
Period11/09/2312/09/23
Internet address

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