Using peer-interviewing methods to explore place-based disadvantage: Dissolving the distance between suits and civilians

Deborah Warr, Rosemary Mann, Theonie Tacticos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Collaborative and participatory research methods reflect ideals to undertake research in consultation and partnership with communities and to advance community empowerment and capacity. They offer ethical and practical approaches for conducting research addressing socioeconomic and health disparities particularly in marginalised or vulnerable communities. Peer-interviewing is one such participatory strategy employed in studies involving hard-to-reach populations. However, while the value of peer-interviewing for researchers is noted in the methodological literature, there are few discussions that critically examine the benefits and challenges of using peer-researcher approaches, either for the interviewers themselves or the communities they represent. This study reports the findings from a qualitative study that explored the experiences of peer-interviewers who were involved in undertaking community surveys of residents in the socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods in which they lived. We discuss the benefits and challenges that participants reported from their involvement.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)337-352
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of Social Research Methodology
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Sep 2011

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