Using the perceive, recall, plan and perform assessment of cognitive strategy use with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples: Initial exploration of clinical utility

Rebecca Leanne Smith, Judy Ranka, Melissa Nott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
195 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Introduction: Culturally safe and meaningful cognitive assessment methods for use with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are scarce. Concerns are raised regarding the efficacy of existing methods in cross-cultural contexts. The Perceive, Recall, Plan and Perform (PRPP) Assessment offers a person-centred alternative whereby cognitive strategy application is examined during performance of culturally relevant everyday tasks. This paper explores its use with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Australia. Methods: A critical case study design was applied to examine the effectiveness and relevance of the PRPP Assessment with two Aboriginal Australian people in the Northern Territory of Australia. ‘Ivan’ and ‘Jean’ were each receiving occupational therapy through a rehabilitation service over a 6-month period following acquired brain injuries. Ivan and Jean were assessed performing everyday tasks of interest and importance to them as part of routine care. A partnership approach was adopted throughout the process, and both consented to their stories being told. Results: The PRPP Assessment was able to measure changes in Ivan's and Jean's cognitive strategy use and its impact on performance of meaningful tasks. Ivan demonstrated a 46% increase in performance mastery and a 29% increase in cognitive strategy use with most improvements identified in his ability to sense information, initiate action, and continue performance. Jean demonstrated a 71% increase in performance mastery and a 32% increase in cognitive strategy use. Her greatest improvements were in the ability to recall schemes, self-evaluate, and initiate action. Conclusion: The two critical case stories shared in this study suggest that the PRPP Assessment has emerging evidence of clinical utility when used with Aboriginal people with acquired brain impairment. The information gained revealed strengths in performance; it was effective in measuring change in cognitive strategy use, was able to inform the goal setting process, and guided intervention to support cognitive strategy use during task performance.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)446-459
Number of pages14
JournalAustralian Occupational Therapy Journal
Volume70
Issue number4
Early online dateMar 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2023

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