Utilisation of Still-Water Patches by Fish and Shrimp in a Lowland River, With Particular Emphasis on Early Life Stages

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

Abstract

In lowland river systems, in-channel, slow-flowing or still-water areas (still-water patches, SWPs) are considered to be important habitats for many organisms, particularly the earlylife stages of fish and shrimp. However, the distribution of the early life-stages of fish and shrimp among these habitats appears to be very patchy and studies suggest that the quality and diversity of microhabitat conditions within SWPs and the accessibility of SWPs to spawning adults and dispersing young may be important determinants of their suitability as
nursery habitat. The aims of this thesis were to examine the utilisation of still-water patches by fish and shrimp in a lowland river in relation to habitat suitability and accessibility, with particular emphasis on early-life stages. To determine the factors influencing habitat selection among SWPs, the environmental variability in SWP habitat, and both the distribution and the movement patterns of fish and shrimp, were examined in the Broken River, a lowland river in south-eastern Australia.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • University of Canberra
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Humphries, Paul, Principal Supervisor
  • Gawne, Ben, Co-Supervisor, External person
  • Thoms, Martin, Principal Supervisor, External person
Place of PublicationCanberra, ACT
Publisher
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2007
Externally publishedYes

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