Validation of the intelligibility in context scale as a screening tool for preschoolers in Hong Kong

Kaylor Yee Man Ng, Carol Kit Sum To, Sharynne McLeod

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)
26 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The Intelligibility in Context Scale (ICS, McLeod, Harrison, & McCormack, 2012) is a parent report questionnaire for assessing children's speech intelligibility. The original version was developed in English and was based on Environmental Factors identified within the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health-Children and Youth Version (ICF-CY) (World Health Organization, 2007). The ICS has been translated into over 30 languages, including Traditional Chinese (ICS-TC). The aims of the current study were to examine the psychometric properties of the ICS-TC with Cantonese-speaking parent-child dyads and to identify speech measures that were more sensitive to the ICS-TC ratings. A total of 72 Cantonese-speaking preschoolers with (n = 39) and without speech sound disorders (SSD) (n = 33) were recruited. Native Cantonese-speaking parents completed the ICS-TC independently. The measure showed good internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Correlations with speech performance on the Hong Kong Cantonese Articulation Test, and significant difference in ICS-TC mean scores between the two groups provided preliminary support for the validity of ICS-TC and suggested that ICS-TC can differentiate between children with and without SSD with a large effect size of d = 0.74. The optimal cutoff was estimated using Receiver Operative Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, giving a sensitivity of .70 and specificity of .59. ICS-TC mean scores showed a positive correlation with the percentage of initial consonants correct and negative correlation with frequency of atypical errors, and both were moderate in strength. Given the satisfactory psychometric properties of ICS-TC, it may be a valuable clinical tool for screening Cantonese-speaking preschool children's intelligibility.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)316-328
Number of pages13
JournalClinical Linguistics and Phonetics
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2014

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Hong Kong
speaking
Psychometrics
parents
psychometrics
International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health
Speech Intelligibility
Preschool Children
Reproducibility of Results
preschool child
Language
WHO
dyad
Parents
environmental factors
Sensitivity and Specificity
recipient
disability
rating
Screening

Cite this

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title = "Validation of the intelligibility in context scale as a screening tool for preschoolers in Hong Kong",
abstract = "The Intelligibility in Context Scale (ICS, McLeod, Harrison, & McCormack, 2012) is a parent report questionnaire for assessing children's speech intelligibility. The original version was developed in English and was based on Environmental Factors identified within the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health-Children and Youth Version (ICF-CY) (World Health Organization, 2007). The ICS has been translated into over 30 languages, including Traditional Chinese (ICS-TC). The aims of the current study were to examine the psychometric properties of the ICS-TC with Cantonese-speaking parent-child dyads and to identify speech measures that were more sensitive to the ICS-TC ratings. A total of 72 Cantonese-speaking preschoolers with (n = 39) and without speech sound disorders (SSD) (n = 33) were recruited. Native Cantonese-speaking parents completed the ICS-TC independently. The measure showed good internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Correlations with speech performance on the Hong Kong Cantonese Articulation Test, and significant difference in ICS-TC mean scores between the two groups provided preliminary support for the validity of ICS-TC and suggested that ICS-TC can differentiate between children with and without SSD with a large effect size of d = 0.74. The optimal cutoff was estimated using Receiver Operative Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, giving a sensitivity of .70 and specificity of .59. ICS-TC mean scores showed a positive correlation with the percentage of initial consonants correct and negative correlation with frequency of atypical errors, and both were moderate in strength. Given the satisfactory psychometric properties of ICS-TC, it may be a valuable clinical tool for screening Cantonese-speaking preschool children's intelligibility.",
keywords = "Bilingual, Children, Communication, Early childhood, Education, Language, Assessment, Speech, Speech-language pathology, Speech sound disorder, Parent report, Cantonese, Chinese, ICF",
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Validation of the intelligibility in context scale as a screening tool for preschoolers in Hong Kong. / Ng, Kaylor Yee Man; To, Carol Kit Sum; McLeod, Sharynne.

In: Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics, Vol. 28, No. 5, 05.2014, p. 316-328.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - The Intelligibility in Context Scale (ICS, McLeod, Harrison, & McCormack, 2012) is a parent report questionnaire for assessing children's speech intelligibility. The original version was developed in English and was based on Environmental Factors identified within the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health-Children and Youth Version (ICF-CY) (World Health Organization, 2007). The ICS has been translated into over 30 languages, including Traditional Chinese (ICS-TC). The aims of the current study were to examine the psychometric properties of the ICS-TC with Cantonese-speaking parent-child dyads and to identify speech measures that were more sensitive to the ICS-TC ratings. A total of 72 Cantonese-speaking preschoolers with (n = 39) and without speech sound disorders (SSD) (n = 33) were recruited. Native Cantonese-speaking parents completed the ICS-TC independently. The measure showed good internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Correlations with speech performance on the Hong Kong Cantonese Articulation Test, and significant difference in ICS-TC mean scores between the two groups provided preliminary support for the validity of ICS-TC and suggested that ICS-TC can differentiate between children with and without SSD with a large effect size of d = 0.74. The optimal cutoff was estimated using Receiver Operative Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, giving a sensitivity of .70 and specificity of .59. ICS-TC mean scores showed a positive correlation with the percentage of initial consonants correct and negative correlation with frequency of atypical errors, and both were moderate in strength. Given the satisfactory psychometric properties of ICS-TC, it may be a valuable clinical tool for screening Cantonese-speaking preschool children's intelligibility.

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KW - Speech sound disorder

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KW - ICF

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