Veterinarians’ knowledge, attitudes and practices associated with bovine viral diarrhoea virus control and prevention in South-East Australia

Claire McMorrow, Allan Gunn, Shahid Khalfan, Marta Hernandez-Jover, Victoria Brookes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In Australia, the responsibility and associated costs for the control and prevention of Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV) rest solely with producers. Veterinarians provide producers with farm-specific options for BVDV management and support BVDV control and elimination in their region. We surveyed veterinarians to determine their knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) associated with BVDV control in south-east Australia. We found that veterinarians’ recommendations do not always align with producers’ control measures. Veterinarians were uncertain about BVDV prevalence and the proportion of producers using BVDV control measures in their regions. Veterinarians generally promoted biosecurity and vaccination, and were concerned about the welfare and additional disease risks associated with persistently infected (PI) cattle. Veterinarians highlighted concerns about disease risks associated with a previously undocumented practice in which producers collect blood from PI cattle to administer to BVDV naïve cattle; termed “vampire vaccination” in this study. A greater understanding of the burden, impact and economics of BVDV is needed to align veterinarians’ and producers’ KAP to improve BVDV management on farms, and more appreciation of veterinarians’ and producers’ values is needed before BVDV control could be implemented at a regional or country level.
Original languageEnglish
Article number1630
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalAnimals
Volume10
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Sep 2020

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