Virtue signalling to signal trustworthiness, avoid distrust, and scaffold self-trust

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Justin Tosi and Brandon Warmke argue that virtue signalling – saying things in order to improve or protect your moral reputation – has a range of bad consequences and that as such there is a strong moral presumption against engaging in it. I argue that virtue signalling also has a range of good consequences, and that as such there is no default presumption either for or against engaging in it. Following from this, I argue that given that virtue signalling is sometimes bad and sometimes good, we should avoid virtue signalling when we can be confident that the consequences will be bad, and we should press on with signalling when we can be confident that the consequences will be good. For the most part, I focus on three good consequences that are related to trusting dispositions: signalling trustworthiness, avoiding distrust, and scaffolding self-trust. I also highlight some additional positive consequences that are unrelated to trust.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1 - 13
JournalSocial Epistemology: a journal of knowledge, culture and policy
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 21 Dec 2022

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Virtue signalling to signal trustworthiness, avoid distrust, and scaffold self-trust'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this