Waiting for a miracle ... miracles, miraclism and discrimination

Julian Savulescu, Steve Clarke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)
15 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

We argue that the use of publicly funded medical facilities for patients who are waiting for a miracle amounts to discrimination against atheists, agnostics and advocates, of faiths that do not accept miracle claims. The only exception is when this use can be justified by considerations that demonstrate that waiting makes it more likely that a miracle will occur and will aid the patient’s recovery. Such justification can be grounded on considerations of faith or of reason. We consider both possibilities and suggest conditions of acceptability for both. In arguing this way, we steer a middle path between discrimination against atheists, agnostics, and advocates of faiths that do not accept miracle claims – miraclism –and a failure to respect religious belief.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1259-1262
Number of pages4
JournalSouthern Medical Journal
Volume100
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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abstract = "We argue that the use of publicly funded medical facilities for patients who are waiting for a miracle amounts to discrimination against atheists, agnostics and advocates, of faiths that do not accept miracle claims. The only exception is when this use can be justified by considerations that demonstrate that waiting makes it more likely that a miracle will occur and will aid the patient’s recovery. Such justification can be grounded on considerations of faith or of reason. We consider both possibilities and suggest conditions of acceptability for both. In arguing this way, we steer a middle path between discrimination against atheists, agnostics, and advocates of faiths that do not accept miracle claims – miraclism –and a failure to respect religious belief.",
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Waiting for a miracle ... miracles, miraclism and discrimination. / Savulescu, Julian; Clarke, Steve.

In: Southern Medical Journal, Vol. 100, No. 12, 2007, p. 1259-1262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Waiting for a miracle ... miracles, miraclism and discrimination

AU - Savulescu, Julian

AU - Clarke, Steve

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PY - 2007

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N2 - We argue that the use of publicly funded medical facilities for patients who are waiting for a miracle amounts to discrimination against atheists, agnostics and advocates, of faiths that do not accept miracle claims. The only exception is when this use can be justified by considerations that demonstrate that waiting makes it more likely that a miracle will occur and will aid the patient’s recovery. Such justification can be grounded on considerations of faith or of reason. We consider both possibilities and suggest conditions of acceptability for both. In arguing this way, we steer a middle path between discrimination against atheists, agnostics, and advocates of faiths that do not accept miracle claims – miraclism –and a failure to respect religious belief.

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KW - Open access version available

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KW - Faith

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