Water tariffs and farmer adaptation: The case of Goulburn-Murray water in Victoria, Australia

Bethany Cooper, Lin Crase, Nicholas Pawsey

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperChapter (peer-reviewed)

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Abstract

Many economists argue that the most effective way to facilitate human adaptation to a range of phenomena is to allow prices to signal the relative scarcity of resources/goods/services such that individuals and firms modify expectations and use. This response would align costs and prices so that (theoretically at least) less would be used of more costly (scarce) items and more of those less costly (scarce). In the case of water, for example, progressive increases in cost and setting prices to match would signal that users needed to exercise more caution in use and, where possible, substitute other resources.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationApplied studies in climate adaptation
EditorsJean P. Palutikof, Sarah Boulter, Jon Barnett, David Rissik
Place of PublicationChichester, England
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons
Chapter17
Pages156-165
Number of pages10
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9781118845059
ISBN (Print)9781118845011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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    Cooper, B., Crase, L., & Pawsey, N. (2015). Water tariffs and farmer adaptation: The case of Goulburn-Murray water in Victoria, Australia. In J. P. Palutikof, S. Boulter, J. Barnett, & D. Rissik (Eds.), Applied studies in climate adaptation (1st ed., pp. 156-165). John Wiley & Sons. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118845028.ch17