Welfare to work: economic challenges to socially just practice

Fiona Douglas

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperChapter

Abstract

This book goes beyond the rhetoric of the 'self-managed' career and 'employability skills' by exploring career education and guidance from critical and radical standpoints. The contributors question the economic underpinning that has driven social agendas, arguing that career education and guidance needs to place greater emphasis on developing socially just practices. The views expressed help to open up the debate around the impact of globalisation as consideration is given to the ways in which career professionals might actively enable, empower and promote the democratic engagement of all in the shaping of their world(s). The authors consider the issues within a range of contexts including 'race', gender, disability and social class." "Critical Reflections on Career Education and Guidance is essential reading for students, academics, practitioners and researchers who wish to achieve a greater understanding of the contexts involved
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCritical Reflections on career education and guidance
Subtitle of host publicationPromoting social justice within a global economy
EditorsB.A. Irving, B. Malik
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherRoutledgeFalmer
Pages25-40
Number of pages16
Edition1st / 3
ISBN (Print)9780415324533
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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  • Cite this

    Douglas, F. (2005). Welfare to work: economic challenges to socially just practice. In B. A. Irving, & B. Malik (Eds.), Critical Reflections on career education and guidance: Promoting social justice within a global economy (1st / 3 ed., pp. 25-40). RoutledgeFalmer.