What connects Us as Social Workers? Innovations, Future Directions and Global Citizenship WORKSHOP WS32

Research output: Other contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

This is an interactive session providing an opportunity for social workers from around the world to reflect on social work. This forum for co-operative inquiry encourages exchange as a basis for global citizenship and global social work practice. Social work is a dynamic profession that is both culturally-responsive in a fluid and hybridized world, yet fundamentally stable at its core through shared ethics and values. There is a need to affirm, confirm, and extend the above considerations in order to engage in decolonizing practice informed by blended worldviews.
Details of organizers and participating members: Workshop facilitators are academics and postgraduate students from the School of Social Work, Charles Sturt University, Australia.
Contacts: Dr Karen Bell (kbell@csu.edu.au); Dr Susan Mlcek (smlcek@csu.edu.au); Professor Wendy Bowles (wbowles@csu.edu.au).
Synopsis and workshop format:
Using a structured approach, participants draw on concrete experiences as a basis for co-operative learning. Workshops will be facilitated using the
following format:
• Panel presentations - key themes - social work identity, innovations, global social work; (20 minutes)
• Self-selected sub-groups (4-6 participants) identify and discuss concrete experiences relating to three key areas –
1. What does social work mean to me?
2. What is innovative about social work practice?
3. What is the future of global social work?
Sub-groups discuss their experiences of what it means to be a social worker; provide examples of innovations in practice; share ideas about the
future of social work.
Sub-groups keep notes of the key points raised in their discussion; facilitator takes detailed notes to capture the sub-group discussion. (40 minutes)
Each sub-group the reports to the whole group, summarising key points about social work, innovations and the future of the profession.
From whole-group discussion, a summary of key themes emerges.
Workshop notes from facilitators and participants (textual data) collected at the end of the workshop, will be de-identified and collated postconference.

Collated qualitative data will be organised into three broad, constructed topic codes (meanings of social work, innovative practice, and the future of
global social work). Within each topic code, finer analytic codes will be identified through line-by-line coding.
The collated data will be circulated via email to all participants and consideration will be given to producing a journal paper or a discussion paper
based on participants’ contributions. (30 minutes)
Implications for social work: The conference provides a rare opportunity for social workers from around the globe to reflect on social work practice, worldviews, core values and principles in particular. The gathered practice wisdom and lived experiences of social work gathered from social workers from a range of practice contexts and locations will add to the professional knowledge base on global social work and social development.
Target audience: Social work practitioners, educators, students (undergraduate and postgraduate).
Main conference themes: Education and training; Social work practice; Human rights; International Social Work.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2016
EventJoint World Conference on Social Work, Education and Social Development 2016 - COEX Convention and Exhibition Center, Seoul, Korea, Republic of
Duration: 27 Jun 201630 Jun 2016
https://web.archive.org/web/20151229235030/http://www.swsd2016.org:80/eng/sub01_0.php (Conference website)
https://web.archive.org/web/20160403065802/http://www.swsd2016.org/eng/index.php (Conference website)

Conference

ConferenceJoint World Conference on Social Work, Education and Social Development 2016
Abbreviated titlePromoting the Dignity and Worth of People
CountryKorea, Republic of
CitySeoul
Period27/06/1630/06/16
OtherThe Joint World Conference on Social Work, Education and Social Development 2016, under the theme “Promoting the Dignity and Worth of People,” will be held from June 27 (Monday) to June 30 (Thursday), 2016, at the COEX convention and exhibition center in Seoul, South Korea. Hosted internationally by the International Association of Schools of Social Work, International Council on Social Welfare, and International Federation of Social Workers; and hosted locally by Korea National Council on Social Welfare, Korea Association of Social Workers, Korean Council on Social Welfare Education, and Seoul Welfare Foundation; the official conference program will include Plenary sessions, Symposia, and Workshops; with Opening/Closing Ceremonies, Welcome Reception, Cultural Night, and Conference Dinner among the Social Events. The official conference languages will be English, Korean, French, Spanish and Mandarin.
Internet address

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social work
citizenship
innovation
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experience
profession
cooperative learning
social development
wisdom

Cite this

Bell, K., Mlcek, S., Bowles, W., & Thomas, C. (2016). What connects Us as Social Workers? Innovations, Future Directions and Global Citizenship WORKSHOP WS32. Abstract from Joint World Conference on Social Work, Education and Social Development 2016, Seoul, Korea, Republic of.
Bell, Karen ; Mlcek, Susan ; Bowles, Wendy ; Thomas, Catherine. / What connects Us as Social Workers? Innovations, Future Directions and Global Citizenship WORKSHOP WS32. Abstract from Joint World Conference on Social Work, Education and Social Development 2016, Seoul, Korea, Republic of.
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title = "What connects Us as Social Workers? Innovations, Future Directions and Global Citizenship WORKSHOP WS32",
abstract = "This is an interactive session providing an opportunity for social workers from around the world to reflect on social work. This forum for co-operative inquiry encourages exchange as a basis for global citizenship and global social work practice. Social work is a dynamic profession that is both culturally-responsive in a fluid and hybridized world, yet fundamentally stable at its core through shared ethics and values. There is a need to affirm, confirm, and extend the above considerations in order to engage in decolonizing practice informed by blended worldviews.Details of organizers and participating members: Workshop facilitators are academics and postgraduate students from the School of Social Work, Charles Sturt University, Australia.Contacts: Dr Karen Bell (kbell@csu.edu.au); Dr Susan Mlcek (smlcek@csu.edu.au); Professor Wendy Bowles (wbowles@csu.edu.au).Synopsis and workshop format:Using a structured approach, participants draw on concrete experiences as a basis for co-operative learning. Workshops will be facilitated using thefollowing format:• Panel presentations - key themes - social work identity, innovations, global social work; (20 minutes)• Self-selected sub-groups (4-6 participants) identify and discuss concrete experiences relating to three key areas –1. What does social work mean to me?2. What is innovative about social work practice?3. What is the future of global social work?Sub-groups discuss their experiences of what it means to be a social worker; provide examples of innovations in practice; share ideas about thefuture of social work.Sub-groups keep notes of the key points raised in their discussion; facilitator takes detailed notes to capture the sub-group discussion. (40 minutes)Each sub-group the reports to the whole group, summarising key points about social work, innovations and the future of the profession.From whole-group discussion, a summary of key themes emerges.Workshop notes from facilitators and participants (textual data) collected at the end of the workshop, will be de-identified and collated postconference.Collated qualitative data will be organised into three broad, constructed topic codes (meanings of social work, innovative practice, and the future ofglobal social work). Within each topic code, finer analytic codes will be identified through line-by-line coding.The collated data will be circulated via email to all participants and consideration will be given to producing a journal paper or a discussion paperbased on participants’ contributions. (30 minutes)Implications for social work: The conference provides a rare opportunity for social workers from around the globe to reflect on social work practice, worldviews, core values and principles in particular. The gathered practice wisdom and lived experiences of social work gathered from social workers from a range of practice contexts and locations will add to the professional knowledge base on global social work and social development.Target audience: Social work practitioners, educators, students (undergraduate and postgraduate).Main conference themes: Education and training; Social work practice; Human rights; International Social Work.",
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note = "Joint World Conference on Social Work, Education and Social Development 2016, Promoting the Dignity and Worth of People ; Conference date: 27-06-2016 Through 30-06-2016",
url = "https://web.archive.org/web/20151229235030/http://www.swsd2016.org:80/eng/sub01_0.php, https://web.archive.org/web/20160403065802/http://www.swsd2016.org/eng/index.php",

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Bell, K, Mlcek, S, Bowles, W & Thomas, C 2016, 'What connects Us as Social Workers? Innovations, Future Directions and Global Citizenship WORKSHOP WS32' Joint World Conference on Social Work, Education and Social Development 2016, Seoul, Korea, Republic of, 27/06/16 - 30/06/16, .

What connects Us as Social Workers? Innovations, Future Directions and Global Citizenship WORKSHOP WS32. / Bell, Karen; Mlcek, Susan; Bowles, Wendy; Thomas, Catherine.

2016. Abstract from Joint World Conference on Social Work, Education and Social Development 2016, Seoul, Korea, Republic of.

Research output: Other contribution to conferenceAbstract

TY - CONF

T1 - What connects Us as Social Workers? Innovations, Future Directions and Global Citizenship WORKSHOP WS32

AU - Bell, Karen

AU - Mlcek, Susan

AU - Bowles, Wendy

AU - Thomas, Catherine

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - This is an interactive session providing an opportunity for social workers from around the world to reflect on social work. This forum for co-operative inquiry encourages exchange as a basis for global citizenship and global social work practice. Social work is a dynamic profession that is both culturally-responsive in a fluid and hybridized world, yet fundamentally stable at its core through shared ethics and values. There is a need to affirm, confirm, and extend the above considerations in order to engage in decolonizing practice informed by blended worldviews.Details of organizers and participating members: Workshop facilitators are academics and postgraduate students from the School of Social Work, Charles Sturt University, Australia.Contacts: Dr Karen Bell (kbell@csu.edu.au); Dr Susan Mlcek (smlcek@csu.edu.au); Professor Wendy Bowles (wbowles@csu.edu.au).Synopsis and workshop format:Using a structured approach, participants draw on concrete experiences as a basis for co-operative learning. Workshops will be facilitated using thefollowing format:• Panel presentations - key themes - social work identity, innovations, global social work; (20 minutes)• Self-selected sub-groups (4-6 participants) identify and discuss concrete experiences relating to three key areas –1. What does social work mean to me?2. What is innovative about social work practice?3. What is the future of global social work?Sub-groups discuss their experiences of what it means to be a social worker; provide examples of innovations in practice; share ideas about thefuture of social work.Sub-groups keep notes of the key points raised in their discussion; facilitator takes detailed notes to capture the sub-group discussion. (40 minutes)Each sub-group the reports to the whole group, summarising key points about social work, innovations and the future of the profession.From whole-group discussion, a summary of key themes emerges.Workshop notes from facilitators and participants (textual data) collected at the end of the workshop, will be de-identified and collated postconference.Collated qualitative data will be organised into three broad, constructed topic codes (meanings of social work, innovative practice, and the future ofglobal social work). Within each topic code, finer analytic codes will be identified through line-by-line coding.The collated data will be circulated via email to all participants and consideration will be given to producing a journal paper or a discussion paperbased on participants’ contributions. (30 minutes)Implications for social work: The conference provides a rare opportunity for social workers from around the globe to reflect on social work practice, worldviews, core values and principles in particular. The gathered practice wisdom and lived experiences of social work gathered from social workers from a range of practice contexts and locations will add to the professional knowledge base on global social work and social development.Target audience: Social work practitioners, educators, students (undergraduate and postgraduate).Main conference themes: Education and training; Social work practice; Human rights; International Social Work.

AB - This is an interactive session providing an opportunity for social workers from around the world to reflect on social work. This forum for co-operative inquiry encourages exchange as a basis for global citizenship and global social work practice. Social work is a dynamic profession that is both culturally-responsive in a fluid and hybridized world, yet fundamentally stable at its core through shared ethics and values. There is a need to affirm, confirm, and extend the above considerations in order to engage in decolonizing practice informed by blended worldviews.Details of organizers and participating members: Workshop facilitators are academics and postgraduate students from the School of Social Work, Charles Sturt University, Australia.Contacts: Dr Karen Bell (kbell@csu.edu.au); Dr Susan Mlcek (smlcek@csu.edu.au); Professor Wendy Bowles (wbowles@csu.edu.au).Synopsis and workshop format:Using a structured approach, participants draw on concrete experiences as a basis for co-operative learning. Workshops will be facilitated using thefollowing format:• Panel presentations - key themes - social work identity, innovations, global social work; (20 minutes)• Self-selected sub-groups (4-6 participants) identify and discuss concrete experiences relating to three key areas –1. What does social work mean to me?2. What is innovative about social work practice?3. What is the future of global social work?Sub-groups discuss their experiences of what it means to be a social worker; provide examples of innovations in practice; share ideas about thefuture of social work.Sub-groups keep notes of the key points raised in their discussion; facilitator takes detailed notes to capture the sub-group discussion. (40 minutes)Each sub-group the reports to the whole group, summarising key points about social work, innovations and the future of the profession.From whole-group discussion, a summary of key themes emerges.Workshop notes from facilitators and participants (textual data) collected at the end of the workshop, will be de-identified and collated postconference.Collated qualitative data will be organised into three broad, constructed topic codes (meanings of social work, innovative practice, and the future ofglobal social work). Within each topic code, finer analytic codes will be identified through line-by-line coding.The collated data will be circulated via email to all participants and consideration will be given to producing a journal paper or a discussion paperbased on participants’ contributions. (30 minutes)Implications for social work: The conference provides a rare opportunity for social workers from around the globe to reflect on social work practice, worldviews, core values and principles in particular. The gathered practice wisdom and lived experiences of social work gathered from social workers from a range of practice contexts and locations will add to the professional knowledge base on global social work and social development.Target audience: Social work practitioners, educators, students (undergraduate and postgraduate).Main conference themes: Education and training; Social work practice; Human rights; International Social Work.

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M3 - Abstract

ER -

Bell K, Mlcek S, Bowles W, Thomas C. What connects Us as Social Workers? Innovations, Future Directions and Global Citizenship WORKSHOP WS32. 2016. Abstract from Joint World Conference on Social Work, Education and Social Development 2016, Seoul, Korea, Republic of.