What do you know about Compassion Fatigue in midwifery?

Meryn Edwards, Judith Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Central to the role of the midwife is the concept of 'woman-centred' care. There is much evidence to suggest that the partnership which is developed between the midwife and the child-bearing woman results in positive outcomes for the mother and child, as well as a source of job motivation and satisfaction for the midwife (Leinweber and Rowe, 2010). Compassion satisfaction is the positive experience and a sense of achievement in providing effective care and this serves as a major source of motivation to midwives. It is this unique and empathetic relationship between midwife and woman, and the nature of childbearing as a source of trauma, which places the midwife at particular risk of developing compassion fatigue (Leinweber and Rowe, 2010).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)26-28
Number of pages3
JournalAustralian Midwifery News
Volume16
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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title = "What do you know about Compassion Fatigue in midwifery?",
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What do you know about Compassion Fatigue in midwifery? / Edwards, Meryn; Anderson, Judith.

In: Australian Midwifery News, Vol. 16, No. 4, 2016, p. 26-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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