When the Full Moon Rises over the Sunshine State: A Quantitative Evaluation of Queensland Police Calls for Service Relating to the Full Moon 2004 to 2011

Geoffrey Sheldon, Henry Prunckun

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Abstract

Police officers are amongst the strongest believers in the lunar hypothesis—the belief that the full moon affects human behaviour, yet most research fails to support this proposition. When the Full Moon Rises Over the Sunshine State examined eight years of calls for service data from a large metropolitan policing district in Brisbane, Australia. Between 2004 and 2011 data from more than 908,000 service calls were examined to determine if police received more requests for service during the full moon. The study found no support for the lunar hypothesis. It concluded that there was no statistically significant relationship between calls for service and the full moon.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)28-31
Number of pages4
JournalAustralia and New Zealand Journal of Evidence Based Policing
Volume2
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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